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Immigration Policies and their Impact: The Case of New Zealand and Australia

Author

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  • Winkelmann, Rainer

    () (University of Zurich)

Abstract

The paper provides an analysis of the recent immigration history of New Zealand and Australia. It starts with a description of the quantitative dimension of immigration: how many immigrants entered the two countries, and what was the contribution of external migration to population growth. Next, similarities and differences in the current immigration policies are studied. Finally, an attempt is made to evaluate policy outcomes using empirical evidence of immigrants arriving in the 1990s.

Suggested Citation

  • Winkelmann, Rainer, 2000. "Immigration Policies and their Impact: The Case of New Zealand and Australia," IZA Discussion Papers 169, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp169
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Brosnan, Peter & Poot, Jacques, 1987. "Modelling the Determinants of Trans-Tasman Migration after World War II," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 63(183), pages 313-329, December.
    2. Deininger, Klaus & Squire, Lyn, 1996. "A New Data Set Measuring Income Inequality," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 10(3), pages 565-591, September.
    3. Miller, Paul W, 1986. "Immigrant Unemployment in the First Year of Australian Labour Market Activity," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 62(176), pages 82-87, March.
    4. Beggs, John J & Chapman, Bruce J, 1988. "Immigrant Wage Adjustment in Australia: Cross Section and Time-Series Estimates," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 64(186), pages 161-167, September.
    5. Susi Gorbey & Doug James & Jacques Poot, 1999. "Population Forecasting with Endogenous Migration: An Application to Trans-Tasman Migration," International Regional Science Review, , vol. 22(1), pages 69-101, April.
    6. Harry Coccossis & Peter Nijkamp, 2007. "Regional Science in Perspective," SCIENZE REGIONALI, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2007(2), pages 137-140.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Timothy Hatton, 2005. "Explaining trends in UK immigration," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 18(4), pages 719-740, November.
    2. Fertig, Michael, 2002. "Evaluating Immigration Policy Potentials and Limitations," IZA Discussion Papers 437, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Weiss, Volkmar, 2009. "National IQ Means Transformed from Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) Scores, and their Underlying Gene Frequencies," MPRA Paper 14600, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Wolfgang Ochel, 2000. "Immigration Policies: Competing for Skills," CESifo Forum, Ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 1(4), pages 27-33, March.
    5. Peter Bushnell & Wai Kin Choy, 2001. ""Go West, Young Man, Go West!"?," Treasury Working Paper Series 01/07, New Zealand Treasury.
    6. Simon Pemberton & Jennifer Mason, 2007. "Uncovering the “Invisible” Minority: Irish Communities, Economic Inactivity and Welfare Policy in the United Kingdom," European Planning Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(10), pages 1439-1459, November.
    7. Hayden Glass & Wai Kin Choy, 2001. "Brain Drain or Brain Exchange?," Treasury Working Paper Series 01/22, New Zealand Treasury.
    8. repec:wfo:wstudy:59410 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    population growth; skilled immigration; Point system;

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • J68 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Public Policy

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