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Immigration: The New Zealand Experience

Author

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  • Winkelmann, Rainer

    () (University of Zurich)

Abstract

A history of the New Zealand immigration experience and policy is reviewed in this paper. Data from the 1981 and 1996 New Zealand Censuses are used to illustrate changes in the characteristics of immigrants, as well as labor outcomes. The decline in the income of recent immigrants over the period studied is found mainly to be due to changes in the region-of-origin composition. Immigrants are found to have lower income than natives upon arrival. However, income parity is reached after 20-30 years of residence. Immigrants with English speaking background do substantially better in the New Zealand labor market, relative to migrants with non-English speaking background.

Suggested Citation

  • Winkelmann, Rainer, 1999. "Immigration: The New Zealand Experience," IZA Discussion Papers 61, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp61
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Brosnan, Peter & Poot, Jacques, 1987. "Modelling the Determinants of Trans-Tasman Migration after World War II," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 63(183), pages 313-329, December.
    2. George J. Borjas, 1994. "The Economics of Immigration," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 32(4), pages 1667-1717, December.
    3. Harry Coccossis & Peter Nijkamp, 2007. "Regional Science in Perspective," SCIENZE REGIONALI, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2007(2), pages 137-140.
    4. Gani, Azmat & Ward, Bert D., 1995. "Migration of professionals from Fiji to New Zealand: A reduced form supply-demand model," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(9), pages 1633-1637, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Wolfgang Ochel, 2000. "Immigration Policies: Competing for Skills," CESifo Forum, Ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 1(4), pages 27-33, March.
    2. Massimiliano Tani, 2014. "Using a point system for selecting immigrants," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 1-24, May.
    3. Cat Moody, 2006. "Migration and Economic Growth: a 21st Century Perspective," Treasury Working Paper Series 06/02, New Zealand Treasury.
    4. O'Connor, Peter & Stephenson, John & Yeabsley, John, 2012. "Grow for it - How population policies can can promote economic growth," NZIER Working Paper 2012/1, New Zealand Institute of Economic Research.
    5. Bauer, Thomas K. & Lofstrom, Magnus & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2000. "Immigration Policy, Assimilation of Immigrants and Natives' Sentiments towards Immigrants: Evidence from 12 OECD-Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 187, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    assimilation; labor outcomes; Immigration;

    JEL classification:

    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • J68 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Public Policy

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