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Grow for it - How population policies can can promote economic growth

Author

Listed:
  • O'Connor, Peter

    (New Zealand Institute of Economic Research)

  • Stephenson, John

    (New Zealand Institute of Economic Research)

  • Yeabsley, John

    (New Zealand Institute of Economic Research)

Abstract

New Zealand struggles to grow its economy partially due to its small size and remote location. There is little that can be done to change location, but the size can be increased over time. It is feasible to adopt a population policy with the aim of the population reaching 15 million in the next 50 years – an annual growth rate of 2.5% per annum. This would bring the size and density of the population to levels closer to more prosperous European countries. Fifteen million – two and a half times current projections – is a good target, too, as it allows for several large cities, fostering competition within New Zealand.

Suggested Citation

  • O'Connor, Peter & Stephenson, John & Yeabsley, John, 2012. "Grow for it - How population policies can can promote economic growth," NZIER Working Paper 2012/1, New Zealand Institute of Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:nzierw:2012_001
    as

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    File URL: http://nzier.org.nz/publication/grow-for-it-how-population-policies-can-can-promote-economic-growth-nzier-working-paper-20121
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Valeria Cheretskikh, 2018. "The Dependence Of The Russian Economy From The Raw Material Branch And Possible Solutions For This Problem," Annals of marketing-mba, Department of Marketing, Marketing MBA (RSconsult), vol. 1, April.

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