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Economic geography, globalisation and New Zealand's productivity paradox

Author

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  • Philip McCann

Abstract

This paper examines New Zealand's poor productivity performance from the reform period onwards, from the perspective of economic geography. Rather than employing institutional or free-market versus interventionist arguments to explain New Zealand's low productivity, as is usually the case, the argument developed here is that the debate should be considered from a very different viewpoint. If we adopt an economic geography perspective, there is nothing really paradoxical about New Zealand's productivity performance. As such, New Zealand's productivity performance is rather more of a conundrum, a riddle, with a fairly straightforward solution.

Suggested Citation

  • Philip McCann, 2009. "Economic geography, globalisation and New Zealand's productivity paradox," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(3), pages 279-314.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:nzecpp:v:43:y:2009:i:3:p:279-314
    DOI: 10.1080/00779950903308794
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Hong Shangqin & Philip McCann & Les Oxley, 2013. "Innovation in New Zealand: issues of firm size, local market size and economic geography," Chapters,in: Handbook of Industry Studies and Economic Geography, chapter 19, pages 459-478 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Grimes, Arthur & Le Vaillant, Jason & McCann, Philip, 2011. "Auckland's Knowledge Economy: Australasian and European Comparisons," Occasional Papers 11/2, Ministry of Economic Development, New Zealand.
    3. Greene, Francis, 2012. "Should the focus of publicly provided small business assistance be on start-ups or growth businesses?," Occasional Papers 12/2, Ministry of Economic Development, New Zealand.
    4. Les Oxley & Shangqin Hong & Philip McCann, 2013. "Why Size Maters: Investigating the Drivers of Innovation and Economic Performance in New Zealand using the Business Operation Survey," Working Papers in Economics 13/13, University of Waikato.
    5. Grimes, Arthur & Tarrant, Nicholas, 2013. "A New Zealand Urban Population Database," Working Papers 13_07, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
    6. Heatley, David & Howell, Bronwyn, 2010. "Overseas Investment: is New Zealand 'Open for Business'?," Working Paper Series 4054, Victoria University of Wellington, The New Zealand Institute for the Study of Competition and Regulation.
    7. Falvey, Rodney E & Gemmell, Norman & Chang, Cherry & Zheng, Guanyu, 2014. "Explaining International Differences in the Prices of Tradables and Non-Tradables (with a New Zealand Perspective)," Working Paper Series 3425, Victoria University of Wellington, Chair in Public Finance.
    8. Philip S. Morrison, 2011. "The Creative City and its Distributional Consequences: The Case of Wellington," Chapters,in: Handbook of Creative Cities, chapter 24 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    9. O'Connor, Peter & Stephenson, John & Yeabsley, John, 2012. "Grow for it - How population policies can can promote economic growth," NZIER Working Paper 2012/1, New Zealand Institute of Economic Research.
    10. Jacques Poot, 2009. "Trans-Tasman Migration, Transnationalism and Economic Development in Australasia," Working Papers 09_05, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    productivity; cities; trade; migration; geography;

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