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New Zealand’s Diaspora and Overseas-born Population


  • John Bryant
  • David Law

    () (New Zealand Treasury)


Many New Zealand-born people migrate overseas, creating a diaspora, and many overseas-born people migrate to New Zealand. Both the diaspora and the overseas-born population in New Zealand may facilitate the international exchange of goods and ideas. Much discussion of international linkages has, however, been limited by a lack of data on numbers of people involved. Based mainly on place-of-birth data from national censuses, this paper provides estimates of the size and structure of New Zealand’s diaspora and overseas-born population, as well as comparisons with selected OECD countries such as Australia. A tentative conclusion is that the potential contribution of New Zealand’s diaspora may have been overestimated, and the contribution of the overseas-born population underestimated.

Suggested Citation

  • John Bryant & David Law, 2004. "New Zealand’s Diaspora and Overseas-born Population," Treasury Working Paper Series 04/13, New Zealand Treasury.
  • Handle: RePEc:nzt:nztwps:04/13

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. John Bryant & Murat Genc & David Law, 2004. "Trade and Migration to New Zealand," Treasury Working Paper Series 04/18, New Zealand Treasury.
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    Cited by:

    1. John Bryant & Murat Genc & David Law, 2004. "Trade and Migration to New Zealand," Treasury Working Paper Series 04/18, New Zealand Treasury.
    2. David Law & Murat Genç & John Bryant, 2013. "Trade, Diaspora and Migration to New Zealand," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 36(5), pages 582-606, May.
    3. Neil Lunt, 2008. "Boats, planes and trains: British migration, mobility and transnational experience," Migration Letters, Transnational Press London, UK, vol. 5(2), pages 151-165, October.
    4. Dilip Ratha & Sanket Mohapatra & Caglar Ozden & Sonia Plaza & William Shaw & Abebe Shimeles, 2011. "Leveraging Migration for Africa : Remittances, Skills, and Investments
      [Optimisation du phénomène migratoire pour l’Afrique : Envois de fonds, compétences et investissements]
      ," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2300.
    5. Lamara Hadjou, 2015. "Does immigration fosters the Algerian exports? A Static and Dynamic Analysis," ERSA conference papers ersa15p7, European Regional Science Association.
    6. Sonia Plaza, 2013. "Diaspora resources and policies," Chapters,in: International Handbook on the Economics of Migration, chapter 27, pages 505-529 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    7. Jacques Poot, 2009. "Trans-Tasman Migration, Transnationalism and Economic Development in Australasia," Working Papers 09_05, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
    8. Carr, Stuart C. & Inkson, Kerr & Thorn, Kaye, 2005. "From global careers to talent flow: Reinterpreting 'brain drain'," Journal of World Business, Elsevier, vol. 40(4), pages 386-398, November.

    More about this item


    International migration; diaspora; measurement; New Zealand; Australia; population; emigration; immigration;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J19 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Other

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