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Trade in the Shadow of Power : Japanese Industrial Exports in the Interwar years

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  • Tena Junguito, Antonio
  • Ayuso-Díaz, Alejandro

Abstract

During the interwar years, Japanese industrialisation accelerated alongside the expansion of industrial exports to regional markets. Trade blocs in the interwar years were used as an instrument of imperial power to foster exports and as a substitute for productivity to encourage industrial production. The historiography on Japanese industrialisation in the interwar years describes heavy industries' interests in obtaining access to wider markets to increase economies of scale and reduce unit costs. However, this literature provides no quantitative evidence that proves the success of those mechanisms in expanding exports. In this paper we scrutinise how Japan—a relatively poor country—used colonial as well as informal power interventions to expand regional markets for its exports, especially for the most intensive human capital sector of the industrializing economy.

Suggested Citation

  • Tena Junguito, Antonio & Ayuso-Díaz, Alejandro, 2019. "Trade in the Shadow of Power : Japanese Industrial Exports in the Interwar years," IFCS - Working Papers in Economic History.WH 28350, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Instituto Figuerola.
  • Handle: RePEc:cte:whrepe:28350
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Interwar Years;

    JEL classification:

    • N75 - Economic History - - Economic History: Transport, International and Domestic Trade, Energy, and Other Services - - - Asia including Middle East
    • N15 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - Asia including Middle East
    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade

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