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The Oxford Handbook of the Economics of Peace and Conflict

Editor

Listed:
  • Garfinkel, Michelle R.
    (University of California, Irvine)

  • Skaperdas, Stergios
    (University of California, Irvine)

Abstract

Social scientists and policy makers have long been interested in the causes and consequences of peace and conflict. This handbook brings together contributions from leading scholars who take an economic perspective to study the topic. It includes thirty-three chapters and is divided into five parts: Correlates of Peace and Conflict; Consequences and Costs of Conflict; On the Mechanics of Conflict; Conflict and Peace in Economic Context; and Pathways to Peace. Taken together, they demonstrate not only how the tools of economics can be fruitfully used to advance our understanding of conflict, but how explicitly incorporating conflict into economic analysis can add substantively to our understanding of observed economic phenomena. Some chapters are largely empirical, identifying correlates of war and peace and quantifying many of the costs of conflict. Others are more theoretical, exploring a variety of mechanisms that lead to war or are more conducive to peace. Available in OSO: http://www.oxfordhandbooks.com/oso/public/content/oho_economics/9780195392777/toc.html

Suggested Citation

  • Garfinkel, Michelle R. & Skaperdas, Stergios (ed.), 2012. "The Oxford Handbook of the Economics of Peace and Conflict," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195392777.
  • Handle: RePEc:oxp:obooks:9780195392777
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