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Analyse de la Relation Guerres Civiles et Croissance Économique
[Civil Wars and Economic Growth in DRC]

  • Kimbambu Tsasa Vangu, Jean - Paul
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    This paper investigates and tests empirically the relationship between military expenditure, civil wars and economic performance in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DR Congo). Romer – Taylor model is estimated. The Econometric estimates show that there is a positive effect of military expenditure on economic growth and positive relationship in the short term and negative relationship in the long run between the presence of civil wars and economic growth. A new concept was introduced in the analysis to explain the true causes of the civil war in DR Congo, this is the R – GGC.

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    Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 42424.

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    Date of creation: 25 Feb 2012
    Date of revision: 05 Feb 2012
    Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:42424
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