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The New Growth Evidence

  • Jonathan Temple

Why do growth rates differ? This paper surveys the recent empirical literature on economic growth, starting with a discussion of stylized facts, data problems, and statistical methods. Six research questions are emphasized, drawing on growth and convergence research. In answering these questions, the paper argues that efficiency has grown at different rates across countries, casting doubt on neoclassical models in which technology is a public good. The latter half of the paper rounds up a variety of findings before providing answers to all six questions, including a short summary of how differences in growth rates arise.

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File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/jel.37.1.112
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Article provided by American Economic Association in its journal Journal of Economic Literature.

Volume (Year): 37 (1999)
Issue (Month): 1 (March)
Pages: 112-156

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Handle: RePEc:aea:jeclit:v:37:y:1999:i:1:p:112-156
Note: DOI: 10.1257/jel.37.1.112
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  18. Easterly, William, 1994. "Economic stagnation, fixed factors, and policy thresholds," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 525-557, June.
  19. Easterly, William & Levine, Ross, 1997. "Africa's Growth Tragedy: Policies and Ethnic Divisions," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 112(4), pages 1203-50, November.
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