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Economic Growth in Europe since 1945

Editor

Listed:
  • Crafts,Nicholas
  • Toniolo,Gianni

Abstract

This compelling volume re-examines the topic of economic growth in Europe after the Second World War. The contributors approach the subject armed not only with new theoretical ideas, but also with the experience of the 1980s on which to draw. The analysis is based on both applied economics and on economic history. Thus, while the volume is greatly informed by insights from growth theory, emphasis is given to the presentation of chronological and institutional detail. The case study approach and the adoption of a longer-run perspective than is normal for economists allow new insights to be obtained. As well as including chapters that consider the experience of individual European countries, the book explores general European institutional arrangements and historical circumstances. The result is a genuinely comparative picture of post-war growth, with insights that do not emerge from standard cross-section regressions based on the post-1960 period.

Suggested Citation

  • Crafts,Nicholas & Toniolo,Gianni (ed.), 1996. "Economic Growth in Europe since 1945," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521499644, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:cbooks:9780521499644
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Nicholas Crafts, 2013. "Returning to Growth: Policy Lessons from History," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 34(2), pages 255-282, June.
    2. repec:pal:compes:v:59:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1057_s41294-017-0023-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Mirjana cizmovic & Jelena Jankovic & Milenko Popovic, 2015. "Growth Anatomy of Croatian Economy," Ekonomija Economics, Rifin d.o.o., vol. 22(1), pages 159-216.
    4. Crafts, Nicholas, 2017. "The Postwar British Productivity Failure," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 350, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
    5. John Vickers, 2000. "Monetary union and economic growth," Working Paper Research 10, National Bank of Belgium.
    6. Crafts, Nicholas, 1999. "Quantitative economic history," Economic History Working Papers 22390, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    7. Cristiano Antonelli & Federico Barbiellini Amidei, 2011. "The Dynamics of Knowledge Externalities," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 13292.
    8. Claire Giordano & Francesco Zollino, 2017. "Macroeconomic estimates of Italy’s mark-ups in the long-run, 1861-2012," Quaderni di storia economica (Economic History Working Papers) 39, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    9. Bart van Ark & Mary O’Mahony & Marcel P. Timmer, 2012. "Europe’s Productivity Performance in Comparative Perspective: Trends, Causes and Recent Developments," Chapters,in: Industrial Productivity in Europe, chapter 3 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    10. Correa-López Mónica & de Blas Beatriz, 2012. "International Transmission of Medium-Term Technology Cycles: Evidence from Spain as a Recipient Country," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 12(1), pages 1-52, November.
    11. Christian Westerlind Wigstrom, 2013. "A British Investment Bank: Why and How?," Global Policy, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 4, pages 22-29, July.
    12. Manamba EPAPHRA & John MASSAWE, 2016. "Investment and Economic Growth: An Empirical Analysis for Tanzania," Turkish Economic Review, KSP Journals, vol. 3(4), pages 578-609, December.
    13. Tamás Vonyó & Alexander Klein, 2019. "Why did socialist economies fail? The role of factor inputs reconsidered," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 72(1), pages 317-345, February.
    14. Michael Siegenthaler, 2015. "Has Switzerland Really Been Marked by Low Productivity Growth? Hours Worked and Labor Productivity in Switzerland in a Long-run Perspective," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 61(2), pages 353-372, June.
    15. Ana Gómez-Loscos & María Dolores Gadea & Antonio Montañés, 2012. "Economic growth, inflation and oil shocks: are the 1970s coming back?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(35), pages 4575-4589, December.
    16. ., 2013. "Europe's Productivity Performance in Comparative Perspective: Trends, Causes and Projections," Chapters,in: World Economic Performance, chapter 11, pages 290-316 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    17. Nauro F Campos & Fabrizio Coricelli, 2017. "EU Membership, Mrs Thatcher’s Reforms and Britain’s Economic Decline," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 59(2), pages 169-193, June.
    18. Steffen Lange & Peter Putz & Thomas Kopp, 2016. "Do Mature Economies Grow Exponentially?," Papers 1601.04028, arXiv.org.
    19. Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2011. "Industrial Catching Up in the Poor Periphery 1870-1975," NBER Working Papers 16809, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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