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Is one of the 'peace dividends' negative? Military expenditure and economic growth in the wealthy OECD countries

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  • Landau, Daniel

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  • Landau, Daniel, 1996. "Is one of the 'peace dividends' negative? Military expenditure and economic growth in the wealthy OECD countries," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 183-195.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:quaeco:v:36:y:1996:i:2:p:183-195
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Erich Weede, 1986. "Rent Seeking, Military Participation, and Economic Performance in LDCs," Journal of Conflict Resolution, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 30(2), pages 291-314, June.
    2. Robert J. Barro, 1991. "Economic Growth in a Cross Section of Countries," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 407-443.
    3. Landau, Daniel, 1990. "Public Choice and Economic Aid," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 38(3), pages 559-575, April.
    4. Abramovitz, Moses, 1986. "Catching Up, Forging Ahead, and Falling Behind," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 46(02), pages 385-406, June.
    5. Daniel Landau, 1985. "Government expenditure and economic growth in the developed countries: 1952–76," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 47(3), pages 459-477, January.
    6. Landau, Daniel, 1986. "Government and Economic Growth in the Less Developed Countries: An Empirical Study for 1960-1980," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 35(1), pages 35-75, October.
    7. Summers, Robert & Heston, Alan, 1988. "A New Set of International Comparisons of Real Product and Price Levels Estimates for 130 Countries, 1950-1985," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 34(1), pages 1-25, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hsien-Hung Kung & Jennifer C. H. Min, 2013. "Military Spending and Economic Growth Nexus in Sixteen Latin and South American Countries: A Bootstrap Panel Causality Test," Journal for Economic Forecasting, Institute for Economic Forecasting, vol. 0(4), pages 171-185, December.
    2. Alptekin, Aynur & Levine, Paul, 2012. "Military expenditure and economic growth: A meta-analysis," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 636-650.
    3. Sefa Awaworyi & Siew Ling Yew, 2014. "The Effect of Military Expenditure on Growth: An Empirical Synthesis," Monash Economics Working Papers 25-14, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    4. repec:bla:rdevec:v:21:y:2017:i:3:p:511-526 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Ahad, Muhammad & Dar, Adeel Ahmad, 2017. "Modeling the Asymmetric Impact of Defense Spending on Economic Growth: An Evidence from Nonlinear ARDL and Multipliers," MPRA Paper 80085, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2017.
    6. Hou Na & Chen Bo, 2014. "Military Spending and Economic Growth in An Augmented Solow Model: A Panel Data Investigation for OECD Countries," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 20(3), pages 1-15, August.
    7. Po‐Sheng Lin & Cheng‐Te Lee, 2012. "Military Spending, Threats And Stochastic Growth," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 64(1), pages 8-19, January.
    8. Dritsakis, N., 2004. "Defense spending and economic growth: an empirical investigation for Greece and Turkey," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 249-264, February.
    9. Kimbambu Tsasa Vangu, Jean - Paul, 2012. "Analyse de la Relation Guerres Civiles et Croissance Économique
      [Civil Wars and Economic Growth in DRC]
      ," MPRA Paper 42424, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 05 Feb 2012.
    10. Joshua Aizenman & Reuven Glick, 2006. "Military expenditure, threats, and growth," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(2), pages 129-155.
    11. Henryk Gurgul & Łukasz Lach & Roland Mestel, 2012. "The relationship between budgetary expenditure and economic growth in Poland," Central European Journal of Operations Research, Springer;Slovak Society for Operations Research;Hungarian Operational Research Society;Czech Society for Operations Research;Österr. Gesellschaft für Operations Research (ÖGOR);Slovenian Society Informatika - Section for Operational Research;Croatian Operational Research Society, vol. 20(1), pages 161-182, March.
    12. Kalyoncu, Huseyin & Yucel, Fatih, 2005. "An analytical approach on defense expenditure and economic growth: the case of Turkey and Greece," MPRA Paper 4262, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2006.
    13. Lin Hung-Pin & Tsung-Li Wang & Cheng-Lang Yang, 2016. "Further Causality Evidence on Arms Race, Inflation and Economic Growth," ECONOMIC COMPUTATION AND ECONOMIC CYBERNETICS STUDIES AND RESEARCH, Faculty of Economic Cybernetics, Statistics and Informatics, vol. 50(2), pages 123-136.
    14. Chad R. Wilkerson & Megan D. Williams, 2008. "How is the rise in national defense spending affecting the Tenth District economy?," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Q II, pages 49-79.
    15. repec:eme:jespps:jes-01-2015-0021 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Cheng-te Lee & Shang-fen Wu, 2015. "Military Spending and Stochastic Growth: A Small Open Economy," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 35(4), pages 2026-2036.
    17. Gurgul, Henryk & Lach, Łukasz, 2011. "Causality analysis between public expenditure and economic growth of Polish economy in last decade," MPRA Paper 52281, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    18. Nusrate Aziz & M. Niaz Asadullah, 2017. "Military spending, armed conflict and economic growth in developing countries in the post-Cold War era," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 44(1), pages 47-68, January.
    19. Shin-Chyang Lee & Cheng-Te Lee & Shang-Fen Wu, 2016. "Military spending and growth: a small open economy stochastic growth model," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(1), pages 105-116, February.

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