IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/taf/defpea/v23y2012i3p303-311.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Using the Feder-Ram and Military Keynesian Models to Examine the Link Between Defence Spending and Economic Growth in Sri Lanka

Author

Listed:
  • Albert Wijeweera
  • Matthew J. Webb

Abstract

This study uses the Feder-Ram model in conjunction with the military Keynesian model to examine the nexus between defence spending and economic growth in Sri Lanka. We find that the Keynesian aggregate demand model is better suited to analyse the link than the Feder-Ram model for the case of Sri Lanka. Based upon our results we expect a higher economic growth rate in Sri Lanka if more public resources are diverted from the defence to civilian sectors of the economy, now that the war between the government and separatist guerrillas has come to an end. However, recent post war events cast doubt upon whether a diversion of sources from military to non-military spending will actually occur. We conclude that the sanguine predictions of our economic analysis are entirely dependent upon the political decisions of the Sri Lankan government for their realization.

Suggested Citation

  • Albert Wijeweera & Matthew J. Webb, 2012. "Using the Feder-Ram and Military Keynesian Models to Examine the Link Between Defence Spending and Economic Growth in Sri Lanka," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(3), pages 303-311, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:defpea:v:23:y:2012:i:3:p:303-311
    DOI: 10.1080/10242694.2011.593352
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1080/10242694.2011.593352
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ching-chong Lai & Jhy-yuan Shieh & Wen-Ya Chang, 2002. "Endogenous Growth and Defense Expenditures: A New Explanation of the Benoit Hypothesis," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(3), pages 179-186.
    2. Biswas, Basudeb & Ram, Rati, 1986. "Military Expenditures and Economic Growth in Less Developed Countries: An Augmented Model and Further Evidence," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 34(2), pages 361-372, January.
    3. Dakurah, A. Henry & Davies, Stephen P. & Sampath, Rajan K., 2001. "Defense spending and economic growth in developing countries: A causality analysis," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 651-658, August.
    4. Albert Wijeweera & Matthew Webb, 2009. "Military Spending And Economic Growth In Sri Lanka: A Time Series Analysis," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(6), pages 499-508.
    5. H. Sonmez Atesoglu, 2002. "Defense Spending Promotes Aggregate Output in the United States--Evidence from Cointegration Analysis," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(1), pages 55-60.
    6. Feder, Gershon, 1983. "On exports and economic growth," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(1-2), pages 59-73.
    7. Paul Dunne & Eftychia Nikolaidou & Dimitrios Vougas, 2001. "Defence spending and economic growth: A causal analysis for Greece and Turkey," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(1), pages 5-26.
    8. Faini, Riccardo & Annez, Patricia & Taylor, Lance, 1984. "Defense Spending, Economic Structure, and Growth: Evidence among Countries and Over Time," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 32(3), pages 487-498, April.
    9. Joerding, Wayne, 1986. "Economic growth and defense spending : Granger Causality," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 35-40, April.
    10. Engle, Robert & Granger, Clive, 2015. "Co-integration and error correction: Representation, estimation, and testing," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 39(3), pages 106-135.
    11. Halicioglu Ferda, 2004. "Defense Spending and Economic Growth in Turkey: An Empirical Application of New Macroeconomic Theory," Review of Middle East Economics and Finance, De Gruyter, vol. 2(3), pages 34-43, December.
    12. Ã…dne Cappelen & Nils Petter Gleditsch & Olav Bjerkholt, 1984. "Military Spending and Economic Growth in the OECD Countries," Journal of Peace Research, Peace Research Institute Oslo, vol. 21(4), pages 361-373, December.
    13. Hannah Galvin, 2003. "The impact of defence spending on the economic growth of developing countries: A cross-section study," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(1), pages 51-59.
    14. Benoit, Emile, 1978. "Growth and Defense in Developing Countries," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 26(2), pages 271-280, January.
    15. J. Paul Dunne & Ron Smith & Dirk Willenbockel, 2005. "Models Of Military Expenditure And Growth: A Critical Review," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(6), pages 449-461.
    16. Smith, Ronald P., 1980. "Military expenditure and investment in OECD countries, 1954-1973," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 4(1), pages 19-32, March.
    17. F. Gerard Adams & Jere R. Behrman & Michael Boldin, 1991. "Government Expenditures, Defense, and Economic Growth in the Ldcs: A Revised Perspective," Conflict Management and Peace Science, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 11(2), pages 19-35, February.
    18. Newman Kwadwo Kusi, 1994. "Economic Growth and Defense Spending in Developing Countries," Journal of Conflict Resolution, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 38(1), pages 152-159, March.
    19. Smith, R P, 1977. "Military Expenditure and Capitalism," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 1(1), pages 61-76, March.
    20. Chien-Hsun Chen, 1993. "Causality between Defence Spending and Economic Growth: The Case of Mainland China," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 20(6), pages 37-43, October.
    21. Christos Kollias, 1997. "Defence spending and growth in turkey 1954-1993: A causal analysis," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(2), pages 189-204.
    22. Saadet Deger & Ron Smith, 1983. "Military Expenditure and Growth in Less Developed Countries," Journal of Conflict Resolution, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 27(2), pages 335-353, June.
    23. Michael Gerace, 2002. "US Military Expenditures and Economic Growth: Some Evidence from Spectral Methods," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(1), pages 1-11.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. W. Robert J. Alexander, 2015. "The Keynesian IS-MR Model and Military Spending," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(2), pages 213-221, April.
    2. Wang, Tung-Pao & Shyu, Stacy Huey-Pyng & Chou, Han-Chung, 2012. "The impact of defense expenditure on economic productivity in OECD countries," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 2104-2114.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:defpea:v:23:y:2012:i:3:p:303-311. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Chris Longhurst). General contact details of provider: http://www.tandfonline.com/GDPE20 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.