IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/taf/defpea/v26y2015i2p213-221.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The Keynesian IS-MR Model and Military Spending

Author

Listed:
  • W. Robert J. Alexander

Abstract

The issue of guns or butter is one of the most fundamental economic questions, yet there is no consensus on a theoretical framework for examining it. Over the last decade, a version of a simple Keynesian macroeconomic model has been applied a number of times to examining the link between defence spending and economic growth in a range of countries. There are reasons for doubting the soundness of this model as a basis for empirical work.

Suggested Citation

  • W. Robert J. Alexander, 2015. "The Keynesian IS-MR Model and Military Spending," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(2), pages 213-221, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:defpea:v:26:y:2015:i:2:p:213-221
    DOI: 10.1080/10242694.2013.857449
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1080/10242694.2013.857449
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. H. Sonmez Atesoglu, 2009. "Defense Spending And Aggregate Output In The United States," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(1), pages 21-26.
    2. John B. Taylor, 2000. "Teaching Modern Macroeconomics at the Principles Level," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(2), pages 90-94, May.
    3. Michael Woodford, 2011. "Simple Analytics of the Government Expenditure Multiplier," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 3(1), pages 1-35, January.
    4. H. Sonmez Atesoglu, 2002. "Defense Spending Promotes Aggregate Output in the United States--Evidence from Cointegration Analysis," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(1), pages 55-60.
    5. Emi Nakamura & J?n Steinsson, 2014. "Fiscal Stimulus in a Monetary Union: Evidence from US Regions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(3), pages 753-792, March.
    6. Valerie A. Ramey, 2011. "Can Government Purchases Stimulate the Economy?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 49(3), pages 673-685, September.
    7. Albert Wijeweera & Matthew J. Webb, 2012. "Using the Feder-Ram and Military Keynesian Models to Examine the Link Between Defence Spending and Economic Growth in Sri Lanka," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(3), pages 303-311, May.
    8. Robert J. Barro & Charles J. Redlick, 2011. "Macroeconomic Effects From Government Purchases and Taxes," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 126(1), pages 51-102.
    9. Erdal Karagol & Serap Palaz, 2004. "Does defence expenditure deter economic growth in Turkey? A cointegration analysis," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(3), pages 289-298.
    10. Pieroni, Luca & d'Agostino, Giorgio & Lorusso, Marco, 2008. "Can we declare military Keynesianism dead?," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 675-691.
    11. Aviral Kumar Tiwari & Muhammad Shahbaz, 2013. "Does Defence Spending Stimulate Economic Growth In India? A Revisit," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(4), pages 371-395, August.
    12. Halicioglu Ferda, 2004. "Defense Spending and Economic Growth in Turkey: An Empirical Application of New Macroeconomic Theory," Review of Middle East Economics and Finance, De Gruyter, vol. 2(3), pages 34-43, December.
    13. Christos Kollias & Charis Naxakisb & Leonidas Zarangasb, 2004. "Defence Spending and Growth in Cyprus: A Causal Analysis," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(3), pages 299-307.
    14. J. Paul Dunne & Ron Smith & Dirk Willenbockel, 2005. "Models Of Military Expenditure And Growth: A Critical Review," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(6), pages 449-461.
    15. Jonathan Temple, 2006. "Aggregate Production Functions and Growth Economics," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(3), pages 301-317.
    16. Jesus Felipe & John McCombie, 2006. "The Tyranny of the Identity: Growth Accounting Revisited," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(3), pages 283-299.
    17. Jeffrey Smith & M. H. Tuttle, 2008. "Does Defense Spending Really Promote Aggregate Output In The United States?," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(6), pages 435-447.
    18. Jurgen Brauer, 2007. "Data, Models, Coefficients: The Case of United States Military Expenditure," Conflict Management and Peace Science, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 24(1), pages 55-64, February.
    19. David H. Romer, 2000. "Keynesian Macroeconomics without the LM Curve," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(2), pages 149-169, Spring.
    20. Newman Kwadwo Kusi, 1994. "Economic Growth and Defense Spending in Developing Countries," Journal of Conflict Resolution, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 38(1), pages 152-159, March.
    21. Albert Wijeweera & Matthew J. Webb, 2011. "Military Spending and Economic Growth in South Asia: A Panel Data Analysis," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(5), pages 545-554, June.
    22. Rabia Aslam, 2007. "Measuring The Peace Dividend: Evidence From Developing Economies," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(1), pages 39-52.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:defpea:v:26:y:2015:i:2:p:213-221. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Chris Longhurst). General contact details of provider: http://www.tandfonline.com/GDPE20 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.