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The Heterogeneous Effects of Government Spending: It's All About Taxes

Author

Listed:
  • Gaston Navarro

    (Federal Reserve Board)

  • Axelle Ferriere

    (European University Institute)

Abstract

Empirical work suggests that government spending generates large expansions of output and consumption. Most representative-agent models predict a moderate expansion of output, and a crowding-out of consumption. We reconcile these findings by taking into account the distribution of taxes. Using US data from 1913 to 2012, we provide evidence that government spending induces larger expansions in output and consumption when financed with more progressive taxes. We then develop a model with heterogeneous households and idiosyncratic risk, to show that a rise in government spending can be expansionary, both for output and consumption, only if financed with more progressive labor taxes. Key to our results is the model endogenous heterogeneity in households’ marginal propensities to consume and labor supply elasticities. In this respect, the distributional impact of fiscal policy is central to its aggregate effects.

Suggested Citation

  • Gaston Navarro & Axelle Ferriere, 2016. "The Heterogeneous Effects of Government Spending: It's All About Taxes," 2016 Meeting Papers 1286, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed016:1286
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    File URL: https://economicdynamics.org/meetpapers/2016/paper_1286.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Uhlig, Harald, 2005. "What are the effects of monetary policy on output? Results from an agnostic identification procedure," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(2), pages 381-419, March.
    2. Karel Mertens & José L. Montiel Olea, 2013. "Marginal Tax Rates and Income: New Time Series Evidence," NBER Working Papers 19171, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Olivier Blanchard & Roberto Perotti, 2002. "An Empirical Characterization of the Dynamic Effects of Changes in Government Spending and Taxes on Output," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(4), pages 1329-1368.
    4. Jonas E. Arias & Dario Caldara & Juan F. Rubio-Ramírez, 2014. "The Systematic Component of Monetary Policy in SVARs: An Agnostic Identification Procedure," Working Papers 2014-13, FEDEA.
    5. José Mustre-del-Río, 2011. "The aggregate implications of individual labor supply heterogeneity," Research Working Paper RWP 11-09, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.
    6. repec:ucp:jpolec:doi:10.1086/696277 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Valerie A. Ramey & Sarah Zubairy, 2018. "Government Spending Multipliers in Good Times and in Bad: Evidence from US Historical Data," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 126(2), pages 850-901.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. The Heterogeneous Effects of Government Spending: It’s All About Taxes
      by Christian Zimmermann in NEP-DGE blog on 2016-11-14 22:26:17

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Pedro Brinca & Miguel H. Ferreira & Francesco Franco & Hans A. Holter & Laurence Malafry, 2017. "Fiscal Consolidation Programs and Income Inequality," CeBER Working Papers 2017-11, Centre for Business and Economics Research (CeBER), University of Coimbra.
    2. Gaston Navarro & Axelle Ferriere & Daniel Feenberg, 2017. "Evolution of Tax Progressivity in the U.S.: New Estimates and Welfare Implications," 2017 Meeting Papers 989, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    3. Pfammatter, Andrea Corina, 2015. "Do differences in international labor mobility lead to differences in the fiscal multiplier? A theoretical approach," MPRA Paper 68955, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Brinca, Pedro & Holter, Hans A. & Krusell, Per & Malafry, Laurence, 2016. "Fiscal multipliers in the 21st century," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 53-69.
    5. Kopiec, Paweł, 2018. "Employment Prospects and the Propagation of Fiscal Stimulus," MPRA Paper 85029, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. repec:red:issued:18-4 is not listed on IDEAS

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