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Taxation and the Labor Supply: Decisions of the Affluent

  • Robert A. Moffitt
  • Mark Wilhelm

We examine the effect of the 1996 Tax Reform Act on the labor supply of affluent men. The Act reduced marginal tax rates for the affluent more than for other taxpayers. Using instrumental-variables methods with a variety of identifying variables, we find essentially no responsiveness of the hours of work of high-income men to the tax reduction. However, we do find hourly wage rates of such men to have increased over the period.

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File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w6621.pdf
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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 6621.

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Date of creation: Jun 1998
Date of revision:
Publication status: published as Slemrod, J. (ed.) Does Atlas Shrug? Economic Consequences of Taxing the Rich. Russell Sage Foundation and Harvard University Press, 2000.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:6621
Note: PE
Contact details of provider: Postal: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.
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  1. Daniel Feenberg & James Poterba, 1992. "Income Inequality and the Incomes of Very High Income Taxpayers: Evidence from Tax Returns," NBER Working Papers 4229, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Bruce D. Meyer, 1994. "Natural and Quasi- Experiments in Economics," NBER Technical Working Papers 0170, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Triest, Robert K, 1992. "The Effect of Income Taxation on Labor Supply when Deductions Are Endogenous," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 74(1), pages 91-99, February.
  4. Rosen, Harvey S, 1976. "Tax Illusion and the Labor Supply of Married Women," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 58(2), pages 167-72, May.
  5. Thomas MaCurdy & David Green & Harry Paarsch, 1990. "Assessing Empirical Approaches for Analyzing Taxes and Labor Supply," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 25(3), pages 415-490.
  6. Ziliak, J. & Kniesner, T.J., 1995. "Estimating life-cycle labor supply tax effects," Discussion Paper 1995-89, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
  7. Heckman, James J. & Robb, Richard Jr., 1985. "Alternative methods for evaluating the impact of interventions : An overview," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1-2), pages 239-267.
  8. Showalter, Mark H. & Thurston, Norman K., 1997. "Taxes and labor supply of high-income physicians," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(1), pages 73-97, October.
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