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A Model of the Consumption Response to Fiscal Stimulus Payments

  • Gianluca Violante

    (NYU)

  • Greg Kaplan

    (University of Pennsylvania)

Preliminary results show that when this model is parameterized to match a number of targets - in particular the joint cross-sectional distribution of liquid and illiquid wealth - it is able to generate responses to fiscal stimulus payments of the observed order of magnitude. The model is also consistent with two other important facts documented in the empirical literature: 1) household consumption does not respond significantly to large anticipated income changes, and 2) the estimated consumption responses to tax rebates appear to be the result of very high marginal propensities to consume for a minority of households (around 1/4).

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Paper provided by Society for Economic Dynamics in its series 2011 Meeting Papers with number 243.

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Date of creation: 2011
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Handle: RePEc:red:sed011:243
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Society for Economic Dynamics Marina Azzimonti Department of Economics Stonybrook University 10 Nicolls Road Stonybrook NY 11790 USA

Web page: http://www.EconomicDynamics.org/
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  1. John H. Cochrane, 1988. "The Sensitivity of Tests of the Intertemporal Allocation of Consumption to Near-Rational Alternatives," NBER Working Papers 2730, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  4. Misra, Kanishka & Surico, Paolo, 2011. "Heterogeneous Responses and Aggregate Impact of the 2001 Income Tax Rebates," CEPR Discussion Papers 8306, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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  14. Annamaria Lusardi & Daniel Schneider & Peter Tufano, 2011. "Financially Fragile Households: Evidence and Implications," CeRP Working Papers 116, Center for Research on Pensions and Welfare Policies, Turin (Italy).
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  18. Telyukova, Irina A., 2012. "Household Need for Liquidity and the Credit Card Debt Puzzle," University of California at San Diego, Economics Working Paper Series qt0ww2c04z, Department of Economics, UC San Diego.
  19. M. Dolores Collado & Martín Browning, 1999. "-The Response Of Expenditures To Anticipated Income Changes: Panel Data Estimates," Working Papers. Serie AD 1999-19, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
  20. Sydney Ludvigson & Stijn Van Nieuwerburgh & Jack Favilukis, 2010. "The Macroeconomic E¤ects of Housing Wealth, Housing Finance, and Limited Risk-Sharing in General Equilibrium," 2010 Meeting Papers 733, Society for Economic Dynamics.
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