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Inflation and Interest Rates with Endogenous Market Segmentation

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  • Julia K. Thomas
  • Aubhik Khan

Abstract

The authors examine a monetary economy where households incur fixed transactions costs when exchanging bonds and money and, as a result, carry money balances in excess of current spending to limit the frequency of such trades. As only a fraction of households choose to actively trade bonds and money at any given time, the market is endogenously segmented. Moreover, because households in this model economy have the ability to alter the timing of their trading activities, the extent of market segmentation varies over time in response to real and nominal shocks. The authors find that this added flexibility can substantially reinforce both sluggishness in aggregate price adjustment and the persistence of liquidity effects in real and nominal interest rates relative to that seen in models with exogenously segmented markets.
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Suggested Citation

  • Julia K. Thomas & Aubhik Khan, 2005. "Inflation and Interest Rates with Endogenous Market Segmentation," 2005 Meeting Papers 170, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed005:170
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Andre C. Silva, 2011. "Individual and Aggregate Money Demands," FEUNL Working Paper Series wp557, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Faculdade de Economia.
    2. Hirokazu Ishise Nao Sudo, 2013. "Inventory‐Theoretic Money Demand and Relative Price Dynamics," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 45(2-3), pages 299-326, March.
    3. Bridges, Jonathan & Thomas, Ryland, 2012. "The impact of QE on the UK economy – some supportive monetarist arithmetic," Bank of England working papers 442, Bank of England.
    4. Chiu, Jonathan & Molico, Miguel, 2010. "Liquidity, redistribution, and the welfare cost of inflation," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(4), pages 428-438, May.
    5. Gust, Christopher & López-Salido, David, 2014. "Monetary policy and the cyclicality of risk," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 59-75.
    6. Fernando Alvarez & Andrew Atkeson & Chris Edmond, 2009. "Sluggish Responses of Prices and Inflation to Monetary Shocks in an Inventory Model of Money Demand," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 124(3), pages 911-967.
    7. Greg Kaplan & Giovanni L. Violante, 2011. "A Model of the Consumption Response to Fiscal Stimulus Payments," NBER Working Papers 17338, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Liu, Lucy Qian & Wang, Liang & Wright, Randall, 2011. "On The “Hot Potato” Effect Of Inflation: Intensive Versus Extensive Margins," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 15(S2), pages 191-216, September.
    9. Fernando Alvarez & Francesco Lippi, 2014. "Persistent Liquidity Effects and Long-Run Money Demand," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 6(2), pages 71-107, April.
    10. Williamson, Stephen D., 2008. "Monetary policy and distribution," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(6), pages 1038-1053, September.
    11. Stephen D. Williamson, 2009. "Transactions, Credit, and Central Banking in a Model of Segmented Markets," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 12(2), pages 344-362, April.
    12. Landon-Lane, John & Occhino, Filippo, 2008. "Bayesian estimation and evaluation of the segmented markets friction in equilibrium monetary models," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 444-461, March.
    13. Zervou, Anastasia S., 2013. "Financial market segmentation, stock market volatility and the role of monetary policy," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 256-272.
    14. Jonathan Chiu & Miguel Molico, 2011. "Uncertainty, Inflation, and Welfare," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 43, pages 487-512, October.
    15. Yi Wen, 2009. "When does heterogeneity matter?," Working Papers 2009-024, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
    16. Nao Sudo, 2011. "Accounting for the Decline in the Velocity of Money in the Japanese Economy," IMES Discussion Paper Series 11-E-16, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan.

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