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Individual and Aggregate Money Demands

  • Andre C. Silva

I construct a model in which money and bond holdings are consistent with individual decisions and aggregate variables such as production and interest rates. The agents are infinitely-lived, have constant-elasticity preferences, and receive a fraction of their income in money. Each agent solves a Baumol-Tobin money management problem. Markets are segmented because financial frictions make agents trade bonds for money at different times. Trading frequency, consumption, government decisions and prices are mutually consistent. An increase in inflation, for example, implies higher trading frequency, more bonds sold to account for seigniorage, and lower real balances. JEL codes:E3, E4, E5

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Paper provided by Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Faculdade de Economia in its series FEUNL Working Paper Series with number wp557.

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Length: 26 pages
Date of creation: 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:unl:unlfep:wp557
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  1. Jonathan Chiu, 2007. "Endogenously Segmented Asset Market in an Inventory Theoretic Model of Money Demand," Staff Working Papers 07-46, Bank of Canada.
  2. Randall Wright & Guillame Rocheteau, 2003. "Money in Search Equilibrium, in Competitive Equilibrium, and in Competitive Search Equilibrium," Levine's Bibliography 666156000000000302, UCLA Department of Economics.
  3. Ricardo Lagos & Randall Wright, 2002. "A unified framework for monetary theory and policy analysis," Working Paper 0211, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
  4. Julia Thomas & Aubhik Khan, 2012. "Inflation and Interest Rates with Endogenous Market Segmentation," 2012 Meeting Papers 1070, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  5. Reynard, Samuel, 2004. "Financial market participation and the apparent instability of money demand," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(6), pages 1297-1317, September.
  6. Andre C. Silva, 2014. "Rebalancing Frequency and the Welfare Cost of Inflation," FEUNL Working Paper Series wp587, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Faculdade de Economia.
  7. Fernando Alvarez & Andrew Atkeson & Chris Edmond, 2008. "Sluggish responses of prices and inflation to monetary shocks in an inventory model of money demand," Staff Report 417, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  8. Peter N. Ireland, 2008. "On the Welfare Cost of Inflation and the Recent Behavior of Money Demand," NBER Working Papers 14098, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Fernando Alvarez & Francesco Lippi, 2009. "Financial Innovation and the Transactions Demand for Cash," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 77(2), pages 363-402, 03.
  10. Mendizabal, Hugo Rodriguez, 2006. "The Behavior of Money Velocity in High and Low Inflation Countries," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 38(1), pages 209-228, February.
  11. Aleksander Berentsen & Gabriele Camera & Christopher Waller, . "The Distribution of Money and Prices in an Equilibrium with Lotteries," IEW - Working Papers 174, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich.
  12. Casey B. Mulligan & Xavier Sala-i-Martin, 2000. "Extensive Margins and the Demand for Money at Low Interest Rates," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 108(5), pages 961-991, October.
  13. Pedro Teles & Ruilin Zhou, 2005. "A stable money demand: Looking for the right monetary aggregate," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue Q I, pages 50-63.
  14. William J. Baumol, 1952. "The Transactions Demand for Cash: An Inventory Theoretic Approach," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 66(4), pages 545-556.
  15. Fernando Alvarez & Andrew Atkeson & Patrick J. Kehoe, 2002. "Money, Interest Rates, and Exchange Rates with Endogenously Segmented Markets," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 110(1), pages 73-112, February.
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