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Endogenously Segmented Asset Market in an Inventory Theoretic Model of Money Demand

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  • Jonathan Chiu

    () (Economics University of Western Ontario)

Abstract

This paper studies the effects of monetary policy in an inventory theoretic model of money demand. In this model, agents keep inventories of money, despite the fact that money is dominated in rate of return by interest bearing assets, because they must pay a fixed cost to transfer funds between the asset market and the goods market. Unlike the exogenous segmentation models in the literature, the timings of money transfers are endogenous. By allowing agents to choose the timings of money transfers, the model endogenizes the degree of market segmentation as well as the magnitude of liquidity effects, price sluggishness and variability of velocity. First, I show that the endogenous segmentation model can generate the positive long run relationship between money growth and velocity in the data which the exogenous segmentation model fails to capture. Second, I show that the short run effects of money shocks in an exogenous segmentation model (such as the linear inflation response to money shock, the liquidity effect and the sluggish price adjustment) are not robust. In an endogenous segmentation model, the equilibrium response to money shocks is non-linear and non-monotonic. Moreover, for large money shocks, there is no liquidity effect and no sluggish price adjustment.
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Suggested Citation

  • Jonathan Chiu, 2005. "Endogenously Segmented Asset Market in an Inventory Theoretic Model of Money Demand," 2005 Meeting Papers 108, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed005:108
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Stephen D. Williamson, 2009. "Transactions, Credit, and Central Banking in a Model of Segmented Markets," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 12(2), pages 344-362, April.
    2. Julia K. Thomas & Aubhik Khan, 2005. "Inflation and Interest Rates with Endogenous Market Segmentation," 2005 Meeting Papers 170, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    3. Andre C. Silva, 2011. "Individual and Aggregate Money Demands," FEUNL Working Paper Series wp557, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Faculdade de Economia.
    4. Williamson, Stephen D., 2008. "Monetary policy and distribution," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(6), pages 1038-1053, September.
    5. Allen Head & Beverly Lapham, 2006. "Search, Market Power, and Inflation Dynamics," 2006 Meeting Papers 559, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    6. Chiu, Jonathan & Molico, Miguel, 2010. "Liquidity, redistribution, and the welfare cost of inflation," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(4), pages 428-438, May.
    7. Hirokazu Ishise Nao Sudo, 2013. "Inventory‐Theoretic Money Demand and Relative Price Dynamics," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 45(2-3), pages 299-326, March.
    8. Yi Wen, 2009. "When does heterogeneity matter?," Working Papers 2009-024, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
    9. Wen, Yi, 2015. "Money, liquidity and welfare," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 1-24.
    10. Jonathan Chiu & Miguel Molico, 2011. "Uncertainty, Inflation, and Welfare," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 43, pages 487-512, October.
    11. Fernando Alvarez & Andrew Atkeson & Chris Edmond, 2009. "Sluggish Responses of Prices and Inflation to Monetary Shocks in an Inventory Model of Money Demand," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 124(3), pages 911-967.
    12. Young Sik Kim & Manjong Lee, 2010. "An Analytical Approach to the Liquidity Effects of Monetary Policy," Korean Economic Review, Korean Economic Association, vol. 26, pages 453-475.
    13. Liu, Lucy Qian & Wang, Liang & Wright, Randall, 2011. "On The “Hot Potato” Effect Of Inflation: Intensive Versus Extensive Margins," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 15(S2), pages 191-216, September.
    14. Dixon, Huw & Pourpourides, Panayiotis M., 2016. "On imperfect competition with occasionally binding cash-in-advance constraints," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 72-85.
    15. Aleksander Berentsen & Samuel Huber & Alessandro Marchesiani, 2015. "Financial Innovations, Money Demand, and the Welfare Cost of Inflation," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 47(S2), pages 223-261, June.
    16. Randall Wright & Philipp Kircher & Benoit Julîen & Veronica Guerrieri, 2017. "Directed Search: A Guided Tour," NBER Working Papers 23884, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    17. Choi, Hyung Sun, 2015. "Monetary policy, endogenous transactions, and financial market segmentation," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 234-251.
    18. Miguel Molico & Yahong Zhang, 2006. "Monetary Policy and the Distribution of Money and Capital," Computing in Economics and Finance 2006 136, Society for Computational Economics.
    19. Huberto M. Ennis, 2009. "Avoiding The Inflation Tax," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 50(2), pages 607-625, May.
    20. Yi Wen, 2012. "Liquidity and welfare," Working Papers 2012-037, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
    21. André C. Silva, 2012. "Rebalancing Frequency and the Welfare Cost of Inflation," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 4(2), pages 153-183, April.
    22. Mahmoudi, Babak, 2013. "Open-Market Operations, Asset Distributions, and Endogenous Market Segmentation," MPRA Paper 50089, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    23. Nao Sudo, 2011. "Accounting for the Decline in the Velocity of Money in the Japanese Economy," IMES Discussion Paper Series 11-E-16, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan.
    24. Sylvia Xiao & Randall Wright & Guillaume Rocheteau, 2017. "Open Market Operations," 2017 Meeting Papers 345, Society for Economic Dynamics.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E41 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Demand for Money
    • E50 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - General

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