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Sticky price and limited participation models of money: a comparison

Author

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  • Lawrence J. Christiano
  • Martin Eichenbaum
  • Charles L. Evans

Abstract

We provide new evidence that models of the monetary transmission mechanism should be consistent with at least the following facts. After a contractionary monetary policy shock, the aggregate price level responds very little, aggregate output falls, interest rates initially rise, real wages decline by a modest amount, and profits fall. We compare the ability of sticky price and limited participation models with frictionless labor markets to account for these facts. The key failing of the sticky price model lies in its conterfactual implications for profits. The limited participation model can account for all the above facts, but only if one is willing to assume a high labor supply elasticity (2 percent) and a high markup (40 percent). The shortcomings of both models reflect the absence of labor market frictions, such as wage contracts of factor hoarding, which dampen movements in the marginal cost of production after a monetary policy shock. nerships or affiliated with banking organizations are less likely to provide debt financing than other SBICs.

Suggested Citation

  • Lawrence J. Christiano & Martin Eichenbaum & Charles L. Evans, 1996. "Sticky price and limited participation models of money: a comparison," Working Paper Series, Macroeconomic Issues WP-96-28, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, revised 1996.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedhma:wp-96-28
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Hervé Boulhol, 2008. "The Convergence of Price–cost Margins," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 19(2), pages 221-240, April.
    2. Rotemberg, Julio J. & Woodford, Michael, 1999. "The cyclical behavior of prices and costs," Handbook of Macroeconomics, in: J. B. Taylor & M. Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Macroeconomics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 16, pages 1051-1135, Elsevier.
    3. Uhlig, Harald, 2005. "What are the effects of monetary policy on output? Results from an agnostic identification procedure," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(2), pages 381-419, March.
    4. Kim, Jinill, 2000. "Constructing and estimating a realistic optimizing model of monetary policy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(2), pages 329-359, April.
    5. Kolver Hernandez, 2004. "Inflation and Output Dynamics with State-Dependent Frequency of Price Changes," Macroeconomics 0411020, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. G. Coenen & J.-L. Vega, 2001. "The demand for M3 in the euro area," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(6), pages 727-748.
    7. Farmer, Roger E.A., 2000. "Two New Keynesian Theories Of Sticky Prices," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 4(1), pages 74-107, March.
    8. Bean, Charles & Larsen, Jens D. J. & Nikolov, Kalin, 2002. "Financial frictions and the monetary transmission mechanism: theory, evidence and policy implications," Working Paper Series 0113, European Central Bank.

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    Keywords

    Prices; Money theory;

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