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Financial innovations, money demand, and the welfare cost of inflation

  • Aleksander Berentsen
  • Samuel Huber
  • Alessandro Marchesiani

In the 1990s, the empirical relation between money demand and interest rates began to fall apart. We analyze to what extent improved access to money markets can explain this break-down. For this purpose, we construct a microfounded monetary model with a money market, which provides insurance against liquidity shocks by offering short-term loans and by paying interest on money market deposits. We calibrate the model to U.S. data and find that improved access to money markets can explain the behavior of money demand very well. Furthermore, we show that, by allocating money more efficiently, better access to money markets decrease the welfare cost of inflation substantially.

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Paper provided by Department of Economics - University of Zurich in its series ECON - Working Papers with number 136.

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Date of creation: Jan 2014
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Handle: RePEc:zur:econwp:136
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  1. Christopoulou, Rebekka & Vermeulen, Philip, 2008. "Markups in the euro area and the US over the period 1981-2004: a comparison of 50 sectors," Working Paper Series 0856, European Central Bank.
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  11. Fernando Alvarez & Andrew Atkeson & Chris Edmond, 2009. "Sluggish Responses of Prices and Inflation to Monetary Shocks in an Inventory Model of Money Demand," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 124(3), pages 911-967.
  12. Benjamin Lester & Andrew Postlewaite & Randall Wright, 2012. "Information, Liquidity, Asset Prices, and Monetary Policy," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 79(3), pages 1209-1238.
  13. Dale T. Mortensen & Randall Wright, 2002. "Competitive Pricing and Efficiency in Search Equilibrium," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 43(1), pages 1-20, February.
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  16. Jonathan Chiu, 2005. "Endogenously Segmented Asset Market in an Inventory Theoretic Model of Money Demand," 2005 Meeting Papers 108, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  17. Reynard, Samuel, 2004. "Financial market participation and the apparent instability of money demand," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(6), pages 1297-1317, September.
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