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On the stability of money demand

Author

Listed:
  • Robert Lucas, Jr.

    (University of Chicago)

  • Juan Nicolini

    (Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis)

Abstract

In this paper we consider a simple model of transactional assets management to evaluate the changes in banking regulation that passed between 1980 and 1982. The model implies that the newly created deposits in the US after the deregulation should be taken into account in the proper definition of money, in a way the model itself makes explicit. We show that once this is taken into account, the money demand equation characterized by Meltzer (1960) and Lucas (2000) remained remarkably stable.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert Lucas, Jr. & Juan Nicolini, 2013. "On the stability of money demand," 2013 Meeting Papers 353, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed013:353
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    File URL: https://economicdynamics.org/meetpapers/2013/paper_353.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Peter N. Ireland, 2009. "On the Welfare Cost of Inflation and the Recent Behavior of Money Demand," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(3), pages 1040-1052, June.
    2. Allan H. Meltzer, 1963. "The Demand for Money: The Evidence from the Time Series," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 71, pages 219-219.
    3. Lucas, Robert E., 1988. "Money demand in the United States: A quantitative review," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 137-167, January.
    4. Reynard, Samuel, 2004. "Financial market participation and the apparent instability of money demand," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(6), pages 1297-1317, September.
    5. William J. Baumol, 1952. "The Transactions Demand for Cash: An Inventory Theoretic Approach," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 66(4), pages 545-556.
    6. Fernando Alvarez & Francesco Lippi, 2009. "Financial Innovation and the Transactions Demand for Cash," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 77(2), pages 363-402, March.
    7. Marvin Goodfriend & Monica Hargraves, 1983. "A historical assessment of the rationales and functions of reserve requirements," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue Mar, pages 3-21.
    8. Finn E. Kydland & Scott Freeman, 2000. "Monetary Aggregates and Output," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(5), pages 1125-1135, December.
    9. Robert E. Lucas, Jr., 2000. "Inflation and Welfare," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 68(2), pages 247-274, March.
    10. Brian Motley, 1988. "Should M2 be redefined?," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue Win, pages 33-51.
    11. Rotemberg, Julio J, 1984. "A Monetary Equilibrium Model with Transactions Costs," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 92(1), pages 40-58, February.
    12. Alfred Broaddus & Marvin Goodfriend, 1984. "Base drift and the longer run growth of M1 : experience from a decade of monetary targeting," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue Nov, pages 3-14.
    13. Grossman, Sanford & Weiss, Laurence, 1983. "A Transactions-Based Model of the Monetary Transmission Mechanism," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 73(5), pages 871-880, December.
    14. R. Alton Gilbert, 1986. "Requiem for Regulation Q: what it did and why it passed away," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Feb, pages 22-37.
    15. Barry Z. Cynamon & Donald H. Dutkowsky & Barry E. Jones, 2006. "Redefining the Monetary Agggregates: A Clean Sweep," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 32(4), pages 661-672, Fall.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Claudiu Albulescu & Dominique Pépin, 2016. "The loss of interest for the euro in Romania," Working Papers hal-01361214, HAL.
    2. Claudiu Tiberiu Albulescu & Dominique Pépin & Stephen Miller, 2016. "The micro-foundations of an open economy money demand: An application to the Central and Eastern European countries," Working Papers hal-01348842, HAL.
    3. Hevia, Constantino & Nicolini, Juan Pablo, 2018. "Monitoring money for price stability," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 50-63.
    4. Semyon Malamud & Andreas Schrimpf, 2016. "Intermediation Markups and Monetary Policy Passthrough," Swiss Finance Institute Research Paper Series 16-75, Swiss Finance Institute.
    5. Michael T. Belongia & Peter N. Ireland, 2016. "Money and Output: Friedman and Schwartz Revisited," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 48(6), pages 1223-1266, September.
    6. Claudiu Tiberiu Albulescu & Dominique Pépin, 2018. "Money demand stability, monetary overhang and inflation forecast in the CEE countries," Working Papers hal-01720319, HAL.
    7. Lothian, James R., 2016. "Purchasing power parity and the behavior of prices and nominal exchange rates across exchange-rate regimes," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 5-21.
    8. Lee, Seungduck, 2016. "Money, Asset Prices and the Liquidity Premium," MPRA Paper 75869, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Liang Wang, 2016. "Endogenous Search, Price Dispersion, and Welfare," Working Papers 201616, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Economics.
    10. César Carrera & Jairo Flores, 2017. "Modelling and forecasting money demand: divide and conquer," Working Papers 2017-91, Peruvian Economic Association.
    11. repec:eee:dyncon:v:89:y:2018:i:c:p:64-67 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. repec:fip:fedlrv:00090 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. repec:eee:jmacro:v:54:y:2017:i:pa:p:110-126 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Wang, Zhu & Wolman, Alexander L., 2016. "Payment choice and currency use: Insights from two billion retail transactions," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 94-115.
    15. Wang, Liang, 2016. "Endogenous search, price dispersion, and welfare," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 94-117.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E40 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - General
    • E41 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Demand for Money

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