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Is Quantity Theory Still Alive?


  • Pedro Teles
  • Harald Uhlig


This paper investigates whether the quantity theory of money is still alive. We demonstrate three insights. First, for countries with low inflation, the raw relationship between average inflation and the growth rate of money is tenuous at best. Second, the fit markedly improves, when correcting for variation in output growth and the opportunity cost of money, using elasticities implied by theories of Baumol-Tobin and Miller-Orr. Finally, the sample after 1990 shows considerably less inflation variability, worsening the fit of a one-for-one relationship between money growth and inflation, and generates a fairly low elasticity of money demand.

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  • Pedro Teles & Harald Uhlig, 2010. "Is Quantity Theory Still Alive?," NBER Working Papers 16393, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:16393
    Note: EFG IFM ME

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    Cited by:

    1. Ralf Fendel & Jan-Christoph Ruelke, 2014. "Expectations and the quantity equation - evidence from Eastern European countries," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(3), pages 329-335, January.
    2. Scharnagl, Michael & Mandler, Martin, 2015. "The relationship of simple sum and Divisia monetary aggregates with real GDP and inflation: a wavelet analysis for the US," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 112879, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    3. El-Shagi, Makram & Giesen, Sebastian & Kelly, Logan J., 2015. "The Quantity Theory Revisited: A New Structural Approach," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 19(01), pages 58-78, January.
    4. Avouyi-Dovi, Sanvi & Sahuc, Jean-Guillaume, 2016. "On the sources of macroeconomic stability in the euro area," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 40-63.
    5. von Thadden, Leopold, 2012. "Monetary policy rules in an OLG model with non-superneutral money," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 147-166.
    6. Matheron, J. & Mojon, B. & Sahuc, J.G., 2012. "The sovereign debt crisis and monetary policy," Financial Stability Review, Banque de France, issue 16, pages 155-167, April.
    7. Franz Seitz & Markus A. Schmidt, 2014. "Money In Modern Macro Models: A Review of the Arguments," Journal of Reviews on Global Economics, Lifescience Global, vol. 3, pages 156-174.
    8. Markku Lanne & Jani Luoto & Henri Nyberg, 2014. "Is the Quantity Theory of Money Useful in Forecasting U.S. Inflation?," CREATES Research Papers 2014-26, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.
    9. Pavel Gertler & Boris Hofmann, 2016. "Monetary facts revisited," BIS Working Papers 566, Bank for International Settlements.
    10. Claude Hillinger & Bernd Süssmuth & Marco Sunder, 2012. "The Quantity Theory of Money and Friedmanian Monetary Policy: An Empirical Investigation," CESifo Working Paper Series 3754, CESifo Group Munich.
    11. Pedro Teles & Joana Garcia, 2016. "How can the Phillips curve be used for today's policy?," Economic Bulletin and Financial Stability Report Articles, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.
    12. Mandler, Martin & Scharnagl, Michael, 2014. "Money growth and consumer price inflation in the euro area: A wavelet analysis," Discussion Papers 33/2014, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    13. Maciej Ryczkowski, 2016. "Modern central banking from monetary perspective," Ekonomia i Prawo, Uniwersytet Mikolaja Kopernika, vol. 15(4), pages 547-556, December.
    14. El-Shagi, Makram & Giesen, Sebastian & Kelly, Logan J., 2012. "Monetary Policy in a World Where Money (Also) Matters," IWH Discussion Papers 6/2012, Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH).
    15. João Valle e Azevedo & Ana Pereira, 2010. "Forecasting Inflation (and the Business Cycle?) with Monetary Aggregates," Working Papers w201024, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.
    16. Gianni Amisano & Roberta Colavecchio, 2013. "Money Growth and Inflation: evidence from a Markov Switching Bayesian VAR," Macroeconomics and Finance Series 201304, Hamburg University, Department Wirtschaft und Politik.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E41 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Demand for Money
    • E51 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Money Supply; Credit; Money Multipliers
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies


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