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State of the art of inflation targeting

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Abstract

Inflation targeting has been adopted by an increasing number of central banks as their monetary policy framework. At the start of 2010, some twenty seven central banks were considered fully fledged inflation targeters, and many others are in the process of establishing a full inflation-targeting framework. In this Handbook we publish details of the key features of the inflation-targeting frameworks in each of the 27 inflation targeting central banks around the world. These data enable us to analyse the state of the art of inflation targeting: the legal and institutional arrangements; the design of the inflation target; the decision-making body and process of decision-making; the models and forecasts used by central banks; the accountability mechanisms in place, and the communication and publication strategies. This handbook was written in June 2009 and updated in 2012.

Suggested Citation

  • Gill Hammond, 2012. "State of the art of inflation targeting," Handbooks, Centre for Central Banking Studies, Bank of England, edition 4, number 29, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:ccb:hbooks:29
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gürkaynak, Refet S. & Levin, Andrew & Swanson, Eric T, 2006. "Does Inflation Targeting Anchor Long-Run Inflation Expectations? Evidence from Long-Term Bond Yields in the US, UK and Sweden," CEPR Discussion Papers 5808, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Charles Bean, 2004. "Inflation Targeting: The UK Experience," Perspektiven der Wirtschaftspolitik, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 5(4), pages 405-421, November.
    3. Zanetti, Francesco, 2009. "Effects of product and labor market regulation on macroeconomic outcomes," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 320-332, June.
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    5. Bean, Charles, 1998. "The New UK Monetary Arrangements: A View from the Literature," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 108(451), pages 1795-1809, November.
    6. Athanasios Orphanides & John Williams, 2004. "Imperfect Knowledge, Inflation Expectations, and Monetary Policy," NBER Chapters, in: The Inflation-Targeting Debate, pages 201-246, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Thomas, Carlos & Zanetti, Francesco, 2009. "Labor market reform and price stability: An application to the Euro Area," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(6), pages 885-899, September.
    8. Marco Vega & Diego Winkelried, 2005. "Inflation Targeting and Inflation Behavior: A Successful Story?," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 1(3), December.
    9. Petra M. Geraats, 2009. "Trends in Monetary Policy Transparency," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 12(2), pages 235-268, August.
    10. Gill Hammond & Ravi Kanbur & Eswar Prasad (ed.), 2009. "Monetary Policy Frameworks for Emerging Markets," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 13504.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Forecasting banknotes;

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies

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