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The macroeconomic effects of inflation targeting

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  • Andrew T. Levin
  • Fabio M. Natalucci
  • Jeremy M. Piger

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  • Andrew T. Levin & Fabio M. Natalucci & Jeremy M. Piger, 2004. "The macroeconomic effects of inflation targeting," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, vol. 86(Jul), pages 51-80.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedlrv:y:2004:i:jul:p:51-80:n:v.86no.4
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Amato, Jeffery D. & Gerlach, Stefan, 2002. "Inflation targeting in emerging market and transition economies: Lessons after a decade," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 46(4-5), pages 781-790, May.
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    Keywords

    Inflation (Finance); Macroeconomics;

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