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Are there Economies of Scale in the Demand for Money by Firms? some Panel Data Estimates

Listed author(s):
  • Olympia Bover

    (Banco de España)

  • Nadine Watson

    (NERA)

The purpose of this paper is to estimate elasticities of scale in the demand for money by firms using firm level panel data. In common with the recent literature, we use disaggregate data to overcome the identification problems in aggregate time series approaches. Our main dataset is a sample of Spanish companies that are observed for the period 1983-1996, although we also analyse comparable datasets for the UK and the US. As measures of scale we consider both firm sales and firm output.

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File URL: http://www.bde.es/f/webbde/SES/Secciones/Publicaciones/PublicacionesSeriadas/DocumentosTrabajo/00/Fic/dt0008e.pdf
File Function: First version, 2000
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Paper provided by Banco de España & Working Papers Homepage in its series Working Papers with number 0008.

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Length: 41 pages
Date of creation: 2000
Handle: RePEc:bde:wpaper:0008
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.bde.es/

Web page: http://www.bde.es/bde/en/secciones/informes/Publicaciones_se/docs/
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  1. Casey B. Mulligan & Xavier Sala-I-Martin, 1992. "U.S. Money Demand: Surprising Cross-Sectional Estimates," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 23(2), pages 285-343.
  2. Casey B. Mulligan & Xavier Sala-i-Martin, 1995. "Adoption of financial technologies: Implications for money demand and monetary policy," Economics Working Papers 134, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
  3. Lucas, Robert E., 1988. "Money demand in the United States: A quantitative review," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 137-167, January.
  4. Olympia Bover & Nadine Watson, 2000. "Are there Economies of Scale in the Demand for Money by Firms? some Panel Data Estimates," Working Papers 0008, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
  5. Griliches, Zvi & Hausman, Jerry A., 1986. "Errors in variables in panel data," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 93-118, February.
  6. Pesaran, M. Hashem & Smith, Ron, 1995. "Estimating long-run relationships from dynamic heterogeneous panels," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 79-113, July.
  7. Allan H. Meltzer, 1963. "The Demand for Money: The Evidence from the Time Series," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 71, pages 219-219.
  8. Casey B. Mulligan, 1997. "The demand for money by firms: some additional empirical results," Discussion Paper / Institute for Empirical Macroeconomics 125, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  9. Orazio Attanasio & Luigi Guiso & Tullio Jappelli, 1998. "The Demand for Money, Financial Innovation, and the Welfare Cost of Inflation: An Analysis with Households' Data," CSEF Working Papers 03, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy.
  10. Milton Friedman, 1959. "The Demand for Money: Some Theoretical and Empirical Results," NBER Chapters, in: The Demand for Money: Some Theoretical and Empirical Results, pages 1-29 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Faig, Miquel, 1988. "Characterization of the optimal tax on money when it functions as a medium of exchange," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 137-148, July.
  12. King, Robert G., 1988. "Money demand in the United States: A quantitative review," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 169-172, January.
  13. Feenstra, Robert C., 1986. "Functional equivalence between liquidity costs and the utility of money," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 271-291, March.
  14. Mulligan, Casey B, 1997. "Scale Economies, the Value of Time, and the Demand for Money: Longitudinal Evidence from Firms," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 105(5), pages 1061-1079, October.
  15. Hiroshi Fujiki & Casey B. Mulligan, 1996. "Production, Financial Sophistication, and the Demand for Money by Households and Firms," Monetary and Economic Studies, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan, vol. 14(1), pages 65-103, July.
  16. M Arellano & O Bover, 1990. "Another Look at the Instrumental Variable Estimation of Error-Components Models," CEP Discussion Papers dp0007, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
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