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Implicit interest rates and corporate balance sheets: an analysis using aggregate and disaggregated UK data

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  • Andrew Benito
  • John Whitley

Abstract

Credit channel models emphasise the importance of financial variables in macroeconomic responses to unanticipated economic events. In this paper empirical models are developed that relate implicit interest rates paid by firms to measures of their financial health (principally capital gearing) using both aggregate data and information from individual company accounts. Both aggregate and disaggregated approaches confirm a significant influence on interest rates from changes in the financial health of companies. The aggregate relationship finds support for the hypothesis that implicit interest rates depend on the initial level of indebtedness in a non-linear way. The estimated equation is used within the Bank of England's macroeconomic model (extended to incorporate the balance sheets of the corporate and household sectors) to simulate the role of the credit channel mechanism in response to shocks.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrew Benito & John Whitley, 2003. "Implicit interest rates and corporate balance sheets: an analysis using aggregate and disaggregated UK data," Bank of England working papers 193, Bank of England.
  • Handle: RePEc:boe:boeewp:193
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Myers, Stewart C. & Majluf, Nicholas S., 1984. "Corporate financing and investment decisions when firms have information that investors do not have," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(2), pages 187-221, June.
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    6. repec:sae:niesru:v:139:y::i:1:p:88-94 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. von Kalckreuth, Ulf, 2001. "Monetary transmission in Germany: New Perspectives on Financial Constraints and Investment Spending," Discussion Paper Series 1: Economic Studies 2001,19, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    8. Andrew Benito & Garry Young, 2002. "Financial Pressure and Balance Sheet Adjustment by UK Firms," Working Papers 0209, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Alessandra Guariglia & Marina-Eliza Spaliara & Serafeim Tsoukas, 2016. "To What Extent Does the Interest Burden Affect Firm Survival? Evidence from a Panel of UK Firms during the Recent Financial Crisis," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 78(4), pages 576-594, August.
    2. Spaliara, Marina-Eliza, 2009. "Do financial factors affect the capital-labour ratio? Evidence from UK firm-level data," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 33(10), pages 1932-1947, October.
    3. Jarko Fidrmuc & Philipp Schreiber & Martin Siddiqui, 2015. "The Transmission of Bank Funding to Corporate Loans: Deleveraging in Germany," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 26(3), pages 581-597, July.
    4. Roman Horváth, 2005. "Financial Accelerator Effects in the Balance Sheets of Czech Firms," Working Papers IES 96, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, revised 2005.
    5. Sánchez-Vidal, F. Javier, 2014. "High debt companies' leverage determinants in Spain: A quantile regression approach," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 455-465.
    6. John Whitley & Richard Windram, 2003. "A quantitative framework for commercial property and its relationship to the analysis of the financial stability of the corporate sector," Bank of England working papers 207, Bank of England.
    7. Görg, Holger & Spaliara, Marina-Eliza, 2013. "Export market exit, financial pressure and the crisis," CEPR Discussion Papers 9599, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. Jarko Fidrmuc & Roman Horváth & Eva Horváthová, 2010. "Corporate Interest Rates and the Financial Accelerator in the Czech Republic," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(4), pages 41-54, January.
    9. Ramachandran Azhagaiah & Selvaraj Sathia, 2012. "Corporate Leverage and Financial Decision in the Indian Textile Industry," Managing Global Transitions, University of Primorska, Faculty of Management Koper, vol. 10(1 (Spring), pages 87-114.
    10. Jarko Fidrmuc & Martin Siddiquiy, 2015. "Institutions and Creative Destruction in CEECs: Determinants of Inefficient Use of Assets," Working Papers 353, Leibniz Institut für Ost- und Südosteuropaforschung (Institute for East and Southeast European Studies).

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