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Can We Declare Military Keynesianism Dead?

Author

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  • Luca Pieroni

    (University of Perugia and UWE, Bristol)

  • Giorgio d'Agostino

    (University of Perugia.)

  • Marco Lorusso

    (University of Verona.)

Abstract

This paper empirically tests the Keynesian hypothesis that government defence spending positively impacts on aggregate output, by using a long run equilibrium model for the US and the UK. Our contribution, with respect to previous works, is twofold. First, our inferences are adjusted for structural breaks exhibited by the data concerning fiscal and monetary variables. Second, we take into account different dynamics between defence spending on aggregate output, showing that the results are sensitive to sub-sample choices. Though the estimated elasticities in both countries show a lack of significance in the more recent years of the sample, defence spending priorities addressed to international security may revitalize pro-cyclical effects in the UK, by an industrial policy of defence shared with the EU members.

Suggested Citation

  • Luca Pieroni & Giorgio d'Agostino & Marco Lorusso, 2008. "Can We Declare Military Keynesianism Dead?," Working Papers 0804, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwe:wpaper:0804
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    Cited by:

    1. Manamperi, Nimantha, 2016. "Does military expenditure hinder economic growth? Evidence from Greece and Turkey," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 38(6), pages 1171-1193.
    2. Mirella Damiani, 2010. "Labour regulation, corporate governance and varieties of capitalism," Quaderni del Dipartimento di Economia, Finanza e Statistica 76/2010, Università di Perugia, Dipartimento Economia.
    3. Stefano Herzel & Marco Nicolosi & Cătălin Stărică, 2012. "The cost of sustainability in optimal portfolio decisions," The European Journal of Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(3-4), pages 333-349, May.
    4. Ranjan Kumar Mohanty & Sidheswar Panda & Biswabhusan Bhuyan, 2020. "Does Defence Spending and its Composition Affect Economic Growth in India?," Margin: The Journal of Applied Economic Research, National Council of Applied Economic Research, vol. 14(1), pages 62-85, February.
    5. Giorgio d'Agostino & Luca Pieroni & J Paul Dunne, 2010. "Assessing the Effects of Military Expenditure on Growth," Working Papers 1012, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    6. Christos Kollias & Suzanna-Maria Paleologou, 2015. "Defence And Non-Defence Spending In The Usa: Stimuli To Economic Growth? Comparative Findings From A Semiparametric Approach," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 67(4), pages 359-370, October.
    7. J Paul Dunne, 2011. "Military Keynesianism: An Assessment," Working Papers 1106, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    8. Kollias, Christos & Paleologou, Suzanna-Maria, 2013. "Guns, highways and economic growth in the United States," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 449-455.
    9. Damiani, Mirella & Pompei, Fabrizio & Ricci, Andrea, 2011. "Temporary job protection and productivity growth in EU economies," MPRA Paper 29698, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Rukhsana Kalim & Muhammad Shahid Hassan, 2014. "Public Defense Spending and Poverty in Pakistan," Hacienda Pública Española / Review of Public Economics, IEF, vol. 211(4), pages 93-115, December.
    11. Garfinkel, Michelle R. & Skaperdas, Stergios (ed.), 2012. "The Oxford Handbook of the Economics of Peace and Conflict," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195392777.
    12. Davide Castellani & Fabio Pieri, 2011. "Foreign Investments and Productivity Evidence from European Regions," Quaderni del Dipartimento di Economia, Finanza e Statistica 83/2011, Università di Perugia, Dipartimento Economia.
    13. Silvia Micheli, 2010. "Learning Curve and Wind Power," Quaderni del Dipartimento di Economia, Finanza e Statistica 81/2010, Università di Perugia, Dipartimento Economia.
    14. Marco Lorusso & Luca Pieroni, 2019. "Disentangling Civilian and Military Spending Shocks: A Bayesian DSGE Approach for the US Economy," Journal of Risk and Financial Management, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(3), pages 1-41, September.
    15. Yang, Heewon & Hong, Chanyoung & Jung, Sungmoon & Lee, Jeong-Dong, 2015. "Arms or butter: The economic effect of an increase in military expenditure," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 596-615.
    16. W. Robert J. Alexander, 2015. "The Keynesian IS-MR Model and Military Spending," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(2), pages 213-221, April.
    17. Francesco Venturini, 2011. "Product variety, product quality, and evidence of Schumpeterian endogenous growth: a note," Quaderni del Dipartimento di Economia, Finanza e Statistica 93/2011, Università di Perugia, Dipartimento Economia.
    18. Kollias Christos & Tzeremes Panayiotis & Paleologou Suzanna-Maria, 2020. "Defence Spending and Unemployment in the USA: Disaggregated Analysis by Gender and Age Groups," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 26(2), pages 1-13, May.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Military spending; output; long run models;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • H31 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - Household
    • H4 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods

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