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Defense spending and economic growth: an empirical investigation for Greece and Turkey

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  • Dritsakis, N.

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  • Dritsakis, N., 2004. "Defense spending and economic growth: an empirical investigation for Greece and Turkey," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 249-264, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jpolmo:v:26:y:2004:i:2:p:249-264
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Joerding, Wayne, 1986. "Economic growth and defense spending : Granger Causality," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 35-40, April.
    2. Landau, Daniel, 1996. "Is one of the 'peace dividends' negative? Military expenditure and economic growth in the wealthy OECD countries," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 183-195.
    3. Kwiatkowski, Denis & Phillips, Peter C. B. & Schmidt, Peter & Shin, Yongcheol, 1992. "Testing the null hypothesis of stationarity against the alternative of a unit root : How sure are we that economic time series have a unit root?," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 54(1-3), pages 159-178.
    4. Johansen, Soren & Juselius, Katarina, 1990. "Maximum Likelihood Estimation and Inference on Cointegration--With Applications to the Demand for Money," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 52(2), pages 169-210, May.
    5. George M. Georgiou & Panayotis T. Kapopoulos & Sophia Lazaretou, 1996. "Modelling Greek-Turkish Rivalry: An Empirical Investigation of Defence Spending Dynamics," Journal of Peace Research, Peace Research Institute Oslo, vol. 33(2), pages 229-239, May.
    6. Granger, Clive W J, 1986. "Developments in the Study of Cointegrated Economic Variables," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 48(3), pages 213-228, August.
    7. Engle, Robert F. & Yoo, Byung Sam, 1987. "Forecasting and testing in co-integrated systems," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 143-159, May.
    8. Hartley, Keith & McLean, Pat, 1978. "Military Expenditure and Capitalism: A Comment," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 2(3), pages 287-292, September.
    9. Granger, C. W. J., 1988. "Some recent development in a concept of causality," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 39(1-2), pages 199-211.
    10. Christos Kollias & Suzanna-Maria Paleologou, 2002. "Is there a Greek-Turkish arms race? Some further empirical results from causality tests," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(4), pages 321-328.
    11. Johansen, Soren, 1988. "Statistical analysis of cointegration vectors," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 12(2-3), pages 231-254.
    12. Nelson, Charles R. & Plosser, Charles I., 1982. "Trends and random walks in macroeconmic time series : Some evidence and implications," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 139-162.
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    Cited by:

    1. Manamperi, Nimantha, 2016. "Does military expenditure hinder economic growth? Evidence from Greece and Turkey," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 38(6), pages 1171-1193.
    2. repec:taf:defpea:v:28:y:2017:i:1:p:65-90 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Nicholas Odhiambo, 2015. "Government Expenditure and Economic Growth in South Africa: an Empirical Investigation," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 43(3), pages 393-406, September.
    4. Andreou Andreas S. & Zombanakis George A. & Migiakis Petros M., 2013. "On Defence Expenditure Reduction: Balancing Between Austerity and Security in Greece," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 19(3), pages 437-458, December.
    5. Korhan Gokmenoglu, 2013. "Re-Examination Of Wagner’S Law For Oecd Countries," Annals - Economy Series, Constantin Brancusi University, Faculty of Economics, vol. 1, pages 28-37, February.
    6. repec:bla:rdevec:v:21:y:2017:i:3:p:511-526 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Pieroni, Luca & d'Agostino, Giorgio & Lorusso, Marco, 2008. "Can we declare military Keynesianism dead?," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 675-691.
    8. Bassam AbuAl-Foul, "undated". "Military Spending and Economic Growth: Evidence from Jordan," Economics Working Papers 19-04/2014, School of Business Administration, American University of Sharjah.
    9. Lin Hung-Pin & Tsung-Li Wang & Cheng-Lang Yang, 2016. "Further Causality Evidence on Arms Race, Inflation and Economic Growth," ECONOMIC COMPUTATION AND ECONOMIC CYBERNETICS STUDIES AND RESEARCH, Faculty of Economic Cybernetics, Statistics and Informatics, vol. 50(2), pages 123-136.
    10. Wu, Shih-Ying & Tang, Jenn-Hong & Lin, Eric S., 2010. "The impact of government expenditure on economic growth: How sensitive to the level of development?," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 32(6), pages 804-817, November.
    11. Onur Ozsoy, 2008. "Defence Spending And The Macroeconomy: The Case Of Turkey," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(3), pages 195-208.
    12. Ünal Töngür & Adem Yavuz Elveren, 2016. "The impact of military spending and income inequality on economic growth in Turkey," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(3), pages 433-452, June.
    13. Navarro-Galera, Andrés & Ortúzar Maturana, Rodrigo I., 2011. "Innovating in defence policy through spending efficiency: The Life Cycle Costing model," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 407-425, May.
    14. Andrés Navarro-Galera & Francisco Muñoz-Leyva & Rodrigo Iván Ortúzar Maturana & Juan Lara Rubio, 2014. "Factors influencing the modernization of military-investment economic appraisal systems," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(6), pages 577-604, December.
    15. Christos Kollias & Nikolaos Mylonidis & Suzanna-Maria Paleologou, 2007. "A Panel Data Analysis Of The Nexus Between Defence Spending And Growth In The European Union: A Reply," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(6), pages 581-583.
    16. Magazzino, Cosimo, 2012. "Wagner versus Keynes: Public spending and national income in Italy," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 34(6), pages 890-905.

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