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External security threats, defense expenditures, and the economic growth of less-developed countries

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  • Lipow, Jonathan
  • Antinori, Camille M.

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  • Lipow, Jonathan & Antinori, Camille M., 1995. "External security threats, defense expenditures, and the economic growth of less-developed countries," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 17(6), pages 579-595, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jpolmo:v:17:y:1995:i:6:p:579-595
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Chua, H.B. & Ades, A., 1993. "Regional Instability and Economic Growth: Thy Neighbor's Curse," Papers 704, Yale - Economic Growth Center.
    2. Biswas, Basudeb & Ram, Rati, 1986. "Military Expenditures and Economic Growth in Less Developed Countries: An Augmented Model and Further Evidence," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 34(2), pages 361-372, January.
    3. Leamer, Edward E, 1983. "Let's Take the Con Out of Econometrics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 73(1), pages 31-43, March.
    4. Brauer, Jurgen, 1991. "Military Investments and Economic Growth in Developing Nations," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 39(4), pages 373-384, July.
    5. Stewart, Douglas B, 1991. "Economic Growth and the Defense Burden in Africa and Latin America: Simulations from a Dynamic Model," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 40(1), pages 189-207, October.
    6. Levine, Ross & Renelt, David, 1991. "Cross-country studies of growth and policy : methodological, conceptual, and statistical problems," Policy Research Working Paper Series 608, The World Bank.
    7. Maizels, Alfred & Nissanke, Machiko K., 1986. "The determinants of military expenditures in developing countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 14(9), pages 1125-1140, September.
    8. Leamer, Edward E, 1985. "Sensitivity Analyses Would Help," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(3), pages 308-313, June.
    9. Lim, David, 1983. "Another Look at Growth and Defense in Less Developed Countries," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 31(2), pages 377-384, January.
    10. Faini, Riccardo & Annez, Patricia & Taylor, Lance, 1984. "Defense Spending, Economic Structure, and Growth: Evidence among Countries and Over Time," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 32(3), pages 487-498, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ageli, Mohammed Moosa & Zaidan, Shatha Mousa, 2012. "Consequential Effects of Defence Expenditure on Economic Growth of Saudi Arabia: 1970-2012," MPRA Paper 46590, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Manamperi, Nimantha, 2016. "Does military expenditure hinder economic growth? Evidence from Greece and Turkey," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 38(6), pages 1171-1193.
    3. Alptekin, Aynur & Levine, Paul, 2012. "Military expenditure and economic growth: A meta-analysis," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 636-650.
    4. d'Agostino, Giorgio & Daddi, Pierluigi & Pieroni, Luca & Steinbrueck, Eric, 2014. "Does military spending stimulate growth? An empirical investigation in Italy," MPRA Paper 58290, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Sefa Awaworyi & Siew Ling Yew, 2014. "The Effect of Military Expenditure on Growth: An Empirical Synthesis," Monash Economics Working Papers 25-14, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    6. Ahad, Muhammad & Dar, Adeel Ahmad, 2017. "Modeling the Asymmetric Impact of Defense Spending on Economic Growth: An Evidence from Nonlinear ARDL and Multipliers," MPRA Paper 80085, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2017.
    7. Jhy-Yuan Shieh & Wen-Ya Chang & Ching-Chong Lai, 2007. "An Endogenous Growth Model Of Capital And Arms Accumulation," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(6), pages 557-575.
    8. Lin Hung-Pin & Tsung-Li Wang & Cheng-Lang Yang, 2016. "Further Causality Evidence on Arms Race, Inflation and Economic Growth," ECONOMIC COMPUTATION AND ECONOMIC CYBERNETICS STUDIES AND RESEARCH, Faculty of Economic Cybernetics, Statistics and Informatics, vol. 50(2), pages 123-136.
    9. Kumar, Saten & Pacheco, Gail, 2012. "What determines the long run growth rate in Kenya?," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 34(5), pages 705-718.

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