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Defense spending and economic growth in developing countries: A causality analysis

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  • Dakurah, A. Henry
  • Davies, Stephen P.
  • Sampath, Rajan K.

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  • Dakurah, A. Henry & Davies, Stephen P. & Sampath, Rajan K., 2001. "Defense spending and economic growth in developing countries: A causality analysis," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 651-658, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jpolmo:v:23:y:2001:i:6:p:651-658
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Deger, Saadet, 1986. "Economic Development and Defense Expenditure," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 35(1), pages 179-196, October.
    2. Granger, C. W. J. & Newbold, P., 1974. "Spurious regressions in econometrics," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 2(2), pages 111-120, July.
    3. Joerding, Wayne, 1986. "Economic growth and defense spending : Granger Causality," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 35-40, April.
    4. Anwar, Muhammad Sarfraz & Davies, Stephen & Sampath, R K, 1996. "Causality between Government Expenditures and Economic Growth: An Examination Using Cointegration Techniques," Public Finance = Finances publiques, , vol. 51(2), pages 166-184.
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