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Defense spending and economic growth in Asian economies: A panel error-correction approach

Author

Listed:
  • Habibullah, M.S.
  • Law, Siong-Hook
  • Dayang-Afizzah, A.M.

Abstract

Hoping to contribute to the existing pool of literature, this paper examines the relationship between military expenditure and economic growth in selected Asian countries for the period 1989 to 2004. Our panel unit root test suggests that real GDP per capita and military expenditures are )1(I processes, while the Larsson et al. (2001) panel cointegration test indicates that economic growth and military expendirues are cointegrated. Finally, applying the panel error-correction technique proposed by Pesaran et al. (1999), our empirical results show that defense spending and economic growth in the Asian countries under the period of study are not related.

Suggested Citation

  • Habibullah, M.S. & Law, Siong-Hook & Dayang-Afizzah, A.M., 2008. "Defense spending and economic growth in Asian economies: A panel error-correction approach," MPRA Paper 12105, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:12105
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/12105/1/MPRA_paper_12105.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Nasir M. Khilji & Akhtar Mahmood, 1997. "Military Expenditures and Economic Growth in Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 36(4), pages 791-808.
    2. Yousif Khalifa Al-Yousif, 2002. "Defense Spending and Economic Growth: Some Empirical Evidence from the Arab Gulf Region," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(3), pages 187-197.
    3. Biswas, Basudeb & Ram, Rati, 1986. "Military Expenditures and Economic Growth in Less Developed Countries: An Augmented Model and Further Evidence," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 34(2), pages 361-372, January.
    4. LaCivita, Charles J. & Frederiksen, Peter C., 1991. "Defense spending and economic growth An alternative approach to the causality issue," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 117-126, January.
    5. Dakurah, A. Henry & Davies, Stephen P. & Sampath, Rajan K., 2001. "Defense spending and economic growth in developing countries: A causality analysis," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 651-658, August.
    6. Chung-Nang Lai & Bwo-Nung Huang & Chin-Wei Yang, 2005. "Defense spending and economic growth across the Taiwan straits: a threshold regression model," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(1), pages 45-57.
    7. Breitung, Jörg, 1999. "The local power of some unit root tests for panel data," SFB 373 Discussion Papers 1999,69, Humboldt University of Berlin, Interdisciplinary Research Project 373: Quantification and Simulation of Economic Processes.
    8. Deger, Saadet, 1986. "Economic Development and Defense Expenditure," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 35(1), pages 179-196, October.
    9. Granger, C. W. J. & Newbold, P., 1974. "Spurious regressions in econometrics," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 2(2), pages 111-120, July.
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    11. Erdal Karagol & Serap Palaz, 2004. "Does defence expenditure deter economic growth in Turkey? A cointegration analysis," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(3), pages 289-298.
    12. Maddala, G S & Wu, Shaowen, 1999. " A Comparative Study of Unit Root Tests with Panel Data and a New Simple Test," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 61(0), pages 631-652, Special I.
    13. Frederiksen, P.C., 1991. "Economic Growth and Defense Spending: Evidence on Causality for Selected Asian Countries," Philippine Journal of Development JPD 1991 Vol. XVIII No. 1, Philippine Institute for Development Studies.
    14. Joerding, Wayne, 1986. "Economic growth and defense spending : Granger Causality," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 35-40, April.
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    16. Kollias, Christos & Manolas, George & Paleologou, Suzanna-Maria, 2004. "Defence expenditure and economic growth in the European Union: A causality analysis," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 26(5), pages 553-569, July.
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    18. Baltagi, Badi H & Pinnoi, Nat, 1995. "Public Capital Stock and State Productivity Growth: Further Evidence from an Error Components Model," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 20(2), pages 351-359.
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    Cited by:

    1. Tsangyao Chang & Chien-Chiang Lee & Hsiao-Ping Chu, 2015. "Revisiting the Defense-Growth nexus in European countries," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(3), pages 341-356, June.
    2. Goodness C. Aye & Mehmet Balcilar & John P. Dunne & Rangan Gupta & Reneé van Eyden, 2014. "Military expenditure, economic growth and structural instability: a case study of South Africa," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(6), pages 619-633, December.
    3. Fiaz Hussain & Shahzad Hussain & Naila Erum, 2015. "Are Defense Expenditures Pro Poor or Anti Poor in Pakistan? An Empirical Investigation," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 54(4), pages 875-894.
    4. Obreja Brasoveanu, Laura, 2010. "The Impact of Defense Expenditure on Economic Growth," Journal for Economic Forecasting, Institute for Economic Forecasting, vol. 0(4), pages 148-167, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Military expenditure; Economic growth; Panel unit root; Panel cointegration; Panel error-correction; Asian economies;

    JEL classification:

    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General
    • H56 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - National Security and War
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General

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