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Economic Growth and Defense Spending in Developing Countries

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  • Newman Kwadwo Kusi

    (University of Natal, South Africa)

Abstract

This article investigates the causal relationship between economic growth and defense spending in 77 developing countries. The study employs Granger-causality tests using annual time series data for each of the 77 countries to analyse the presence and direction of causality between the two variables. The results indicate that the relationship between economic growth and defense spending cannot be generalized across countries. It may depend, among other things on the sample period of study and the level of socioeconomic development of the country concerned.

Suggested Citation

  • Newman Kwadwo Kusi, 1994. "Economic Growth and Defense Spending in Developing Countries," Journal of Conflict Resolution, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 38(1), pages 152-159, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:jocore:v:38:y:1994:i:1:p:152-159
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    File URL: http://jcr.sagepub.com/content/38/1/152.abstract
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    Cited by:

    1. Christos Kollias & Suzanna-Maria Paleologou, 2010. "Growth, investment and military expenditure in the European Union-15," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 37(2), pages 228-240, May.
    2. Walker, Douglas M. & Jackson, John D., 1998. "New Goods and Economic Growth: Evidence from Legalized Gambling," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 28(2), pages 47-70, Fall.
    3. Julien Malizard, 2010. "Causality Between Economic Growth and Military Expenditure: The Case of France," Defense & Security Analysis, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(4), pages 401-413, December.
    4. Albert Wijeweera & Matthew J. Webb, 2012. "Using the Feder-Ram and Military Keynesian Models to Examine the Link Between Defence Spending and Economic Growth in Sri Lanka," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(3), pages 303-311, May.
    5. W. Robert J. Alexander, 2015. "The Keynesian IS-MR Model and Military Spending," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(2), pages 213-221, April.
    6. Ourania Dimitraki & Faek Menla Ali, 2015. "The Long-run Causal Relationship Between Military Expenditure and Economic Growth in China: Revisited," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(3), pages 311-326, June.
    7. Jeffrey Smith & M. H. Tuttle, 2008. "Does Defense Spending Really Promote Aggregate Output In The United States?," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(6), pages 435-447.
    8. Thomas Bernauer & Vally Koubi & Fabio Ernst, 2009. "National and Regional Economic Consequences of Swiss Defense Spending," Journal of Peace Research, Peace Research Institute Oslo, vol. 46(4), pages 467-484, July.
    9. Christos Kollias & Nikolaos Mylonidis & Suzanna-Maria Paleologou, 2007. "A Panel Data Analysis Of The Nexus Between Defence Spending And Growth In The European Union: A Reply," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(6), pages 581-583.

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