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Endogenous Growth and Defense Expenditures: A New Explanation of the Benoit Hypothesis

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  • Ching-chong Lai
  • Jhy-yuan Shieh
  • Wen-Ya Chang

Abstract

This paper develops an endogenous growth model to examine the linkage between military expenditures and economic growth. We adopt the modeling strategy where both the supply side and the demand side effects of national defense are taken into considerations. Our result finds that a rise in military spending tends to stimulate the sustained growth rate, confirming Benoit's famous empirical findings.

Suggested Citation

  • Ching-chong Lai & Jhy-yuan Shieh & Wen-Ya Chang, 2002. "Endogenous Growth and Defense Expenditures: A New Explanation of the Benoit Hypothesis," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(3), pages 179-186.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:defpea:v:13:y:2002:i:3:p:179-186
    DOI: 10.1080/10242690210975
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:spr:scient:v:94:y:2013:i:1:d:10.1007_s11192-012-0857-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Wijeweera Albert & Webb Matthew J., 2010. "A Peace Dividend for Sri Lanka: The Case for a Return to Prosperity Following the End of Hostilities," Global Economy Journal, De Gruyter, vol. 10(2), pages 1-11, May.
    3. Lin Hung-Pin & Tsung-Li Wang & Cheng-Lang Yang, 2016. "Further Causality Evidence on Arms Race, Inflation and Economic Growth," ECONOMIC COMPUTATION AND ECONOMIC CYBERNETICS STUDIES AND RESEARCH, Faculty of Economic Cybernetics, Statistics and Informatics, vol. 50(2), pages 123-136.
    4. Syed Ali Raza & Muhammad Shahbaz & Sudharshan Reddy Paramati, 2017. "Dynamics of Military Expenditure and Income Inequality in Pakistan," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 131(3), pages 1035-1055, April.
    5. Cheng-te Lee & Shang-fen Wu, 2015. "Military Spending and Stochastic Growth: A Small Open Economy," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 35(4), pages 2026-2036.
    6. Shin-Jen Tzeng & Ching-Chong Lai & Chun-Chieh Huang, 2008. "Does Military Expenditure Matter For Inflation And Economic Growth?," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(6), pages 471-478.
    7. Gupta, Sanjeev & Clements, Benedict & Bhattacharya, Rina & Chakravarti, Shamit, 2004. "Fiscal consequences of armed conflict and terrorism in low- and middle-income countries," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 403-421, June.
    8. Hung-Pin Lin, 2012. "Does Defense Spending Surprise Long-Run Inflation, Economic Growth and Welfare?," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 32(1), pages 1020-1031.
    9. Albert Wijeweera & Matthew J. Webb, 2012. "Using the Feder-Ram and Military Keynesian Models to Examine the Link Between Defence Spending and Economic Growth in Sri Lanka," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(3), pages 303-311, May.
    10. repec:ipg:wpaper:2014-513 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Po‐Sheng Lin & Cheng‐Te Lee, 2012. "Military Spending, Threats And Stochastic Growth," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 64(1), pages 8-19, January.
    12. Raza, Syed Ali & Shahbaz, Muhammad, 2014. "To Battle Income Inequality, Focus on Military Expenditures: Lesson from Pakistan," MPRA Paper 57773, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Shin-Chyang Lee & Cheng-Te Lee & Shang-Fen Wu, 2016. "Military spending and growth: a small open economy stochastic growth model," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(1), pages 105-116, February.

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