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Transitional Dynamics and Economic Growth in the Neoclassical Model

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  • King, Robert G
  • Rebelo, Sergio T

Abstract

Neoclassical transitional dynamics are a central element of standard macroeconomic theory. Quantitative experiments with the fixed-savings-rate models of the 1960s showed lengthy transitions, thus potentially rationalizing sustained differences in growth rates across countries. The authors investigate quantitative transitional dynamics in various neoclassical models with intertemporally optimizing households. Lengthy transitions occur only with very low intertemporal substitution. Generally, when one tries to explain sustained economic growth with transitional dynamics, there are extremely counterfactual implications. These result from the fact that implied marginal products are extraordinarily high in the early stages of development. Copyright 1993 by American Economic Association.

Suggested Citation

  • King, Robert G & Rebelo, Sergio T, 1993. "Transitional Dynamics and Economic Growth in the Neoclassical Model," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(4), pages 908-931, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:83:y:1993:i:4:p:908-31
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    1. King, Robert G & Rebelo, Sergio, 1990. "Public Policy and Economic Growth: Developing Neoclassical Implications," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(5), pages 126-150, October.
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    4. A. B. Atkinson, 1971. "The Timescale of Economic Model How Long is the Long Run?," Palgrave Macmillan Books, in: F. H. Hahn (ed.), Readings in the Theory of Growth, chapter 19, pages 248-263, Palgrave Macmillan.
    5. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
    6. Nicholas Kaldor, 1961. "Capital Accumulation and Economic Growth," International Economic Association Series, in: D. C. Hague (ed.), The Theory of Capital, chapter 0, pages 177-222, Palgrave Macmillan.
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