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Does Military Expenditure Matter For Inflation And Economic Growth?

  • Shin-Jen Tzeng
  • Ching-Chong Lai
  • Chun-Chieh Huang

This paper sets up a monetary endogenous growth model, and uses it to explain the ambiguous linkage between the military burden and the inflation rate observed in existing empirical studies. It is found that an expansion in the military burden has an ambiguous effect on the inflation rate depending upon the relative extent of two conflicting forces. More specifically, if the increase in the marginal benefit from holding money exceeds (falls short of) the increase in the marginal product of private capital, the inflation rate will rise (fall) in response. Moreover, it is found that an increase in the military burden will stimulate the balanced growth rate, confirming Benoit's famous empirical findings.

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Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Defence and Peace Economics.

Volume (Year): 19 (2008)
Issue (Month): 6 ()
Pages: 471-478

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Handle: RePEc:taf:defpea:v:19:y:2008:i:6:p:471-478
DOI: 10.1080/14775080701606184
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  1. Faini, Riccardo & Annez, Patricia & Taylor, Lance, 1984. "Defense Spending, Economic Structure, and Growth: Evidence among Countries and Over Time," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 32(3), pages 487-98, April.
  2. J Paul Dunne & Ron Smith & Dirk Willenbockel, 2004. "Models of Military Expenditure and Growth: A Critical Review," Working Papers 0408, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
  3. Benjamin O. Fordham, 2003. "The Political and Economic Sources of Inflation in the American Military Budget," Journal of Conflict Resolution, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 47(5), pages 574-593, October.
  4. Brumm, Harold J., 1997. "Military Spending, Government Disarray, and Economic Growth: A Cross-Country Empirical Analysis," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 827-838, October.
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  6. Rebelo, Sergio, 1991. "Long-Run Policy Analysis and Long-Run Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(3), pages 500-521, June.
  7. Ching-chong Lai & Jhy-yuan Shieh & Wen-Ya Chang, 2002. "Endogenous Growth and Defense Expenditures: A New Explanation of the Benoit Hypothesis," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(3), pages 179-186.
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  14. Shieh, Jhy-yuan & Lai, Ching-chong & Chang, Wen-ya, 2002. "The impact of military burden on long-run growth and welfare," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(2), pages 443-454, August.
  15. Barro, Robert J., 1987. "Government spending, interest rates, prices, and budget deficits in the United Kingdom, 1701-1918," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 221-247, September.
  16. Stephen J. Turnovsky, 2000. "Methods of Macroeconomic Dynamics, 2nd Edition," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 2, volume 1, number 0262201232, March.
  17. Lucas, Robert E, Jr, 1980. "Equilibrium in a Pure Currency Economy," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 18(2), pages 203-20, April.
  18. Deger, Saadet & Sen, Somnath, 1983. "Military expenditure, spin-off and economic development," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(1-2), pages 67-83.
  19. Deger, Saadet & Sen, Somnath, 1984. "Optimal control and differential game models of military expenditure in less developed countries," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 153-169, May.
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