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Dépenses militaires et croissance économique dans un contexte non-linéaire : le cas français

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  • J. Malizard

    (GREThA - Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée - UB - Université de Bordeaux - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

Abstract

The aim of this article is to propose further empirical evidence on the defense spending ? economic growth relationship in the case of France. Given the complexity of this nexus, we use a nonlinear model, which is original for the case of France. The results are the following?: (i) a nonlinear approach is better compared to a linear approach?; (ii) the transition variable is the lagged growth rate?; (iii) the asymmetric behaviour of defense burden is highlighted depending to the growth regime?: in the cases of low growth and high growth, the effect is negative but turns to be positive for intermediate growth rates. Classification JEL?: C22, H56, 040
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • J. Malizard, 2014. "Dépenses militaires et croissance économique dans un contexte non-linéaire : le cas français," Post-Print hal-02272387, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:hal-02272387
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-02272387
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    2. Marcus Matthias Keupp, 2021. "Introduction: The Fundamental Economic Problem of the Military," Springer Books, in: Defense Economics, chapter 0, pages 1-21, Springer.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C22 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes
    • H56 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - National Security and War

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