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A non-linear defence-growth nexus? evidence from the US economy

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  • Jesús Crespo Cuaresma
  • Gerhard Reitschuler

Abstract

The defense-growth nexus is investigated empirically using time series data for the US and allowing the effect of defense spending on growth to be non-linear. Using recently developed econometric methods involving threshold regressions, evidence of a level-dependent effect of military expenditure on GDP growth is found: the positive externality effect of defense spending prevails for relatively lower levels of defense spending (with respect to the history of defense spending in the US) and reverts its influence for higher levels.

Suggested Citation

  • Jesús Crespo Cuaresma & Gerhard Reitschuler, 2004. "A non-linear defence-growth nexus? evidence from the US economy," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(1), pages 71-82, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:defpea:v:15:y:2004:i:1:p:71-82
    DOI: 10.1080/1024269042000164504
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Tsangyao Chang & Chien-Chiang Lee & Hsiao-Ping Chu, 2015. "Revisiting the Defense-Growth nexus in European countries," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(3), pages 341-356, June.
    2. Albert J.F. Yang & William N. Trumbull & Chin Wei Yang & Bwo‐Nung Huang, 2011. "On The Relationship Between Military Expenditure, Threat, And Economic Growth: A Nonlinear Approach," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(4), pages 449-457, April.
    3. Alptekin, Aynur & Levine, Paul, 2012. "Military expenditure and economic growth: A meta-analysis," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 636-650.
    4. Chien-Chiang Lee & Sheng-Tung Chen, 2007. "Non-Linearity In The Defence Expenditure - Economic Growth Relationship In Taiwan," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(6), pages 537-555.
    5. d'Agostino, G. & Dunne, J.P. & Pieroni, L., 2011. "Optimal military spending in the US: A time series analysis," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 1068-1077, May.
    6. McDonald Bruce D & Eger Robert J, 2010. "The Defense-Growth Relationship: An Economic Investigation into Post-Soviet States," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 16(1), pages 1-28, September.
    7. Kollias, Christos & Paleologou, Suzanna-Maria, 2013. "Guns, highways and economic growth in the United States," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 449-455.
    8. Uk Heo & John Bohte, 2012. "Who Pays for National Defense? Financing Defense Programs in the United States, 1947–2007," Journal of Conflict Resolution, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 56(3), pages 413-438, June.
    9. Katarina Keller & Panu Poutvaara & Andreas Wagener, 2009. "Military Draft And Economic Growth In Oecd Countries," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(5), pages 373-393, October.
    10. Luca Pieroni, 2007. "Military Spending and Economic Growth," Working Papers 0708, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    11. Phiri, Andrew, 2016. "Does military spending nonlinearly affect economic growth in South Africa?," MPRA Paper 69730, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Mehmet Akif Destek & Ilyas Okumus, 2016. "Military Expenditure and Economic Growth in Brics and Mist Countries: Evidence from Bootstrap Panel Granger Causality Analysis," South-Eastern Europe Journal of Economics, Association of Economic Universities of South and Eastern Europe and the Black Sea Region, vol. 14(2), pages 175-186.
    13. Sheng-Tung Chen, 2016. "A Fiscal View on Analyzing the Impact of Organizing Mega Sporting Events," Journal of Economics and Management, College of Business, Feng Chia University, Taiwan, vol. 12(2), pages 205-226, August.
    14. Abdulnasser Hatemi-J & Tsangyao Chang & Wen-Yi Chen & Feng-Li Lin & Rangan Gupta, 2015. "Asymmetric Granger Causality between Military Expenditures and Economic Growth in Top Six Defense Suppliers," Working Papers 201565, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    15. repec:spr:qualqt:v:52:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s11135-017-0512-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. J. Paul Dunne & Ron Smith & Dirk Willenbockel, 2005. "Models Of Military Expenditure And Growth: A Critical Review," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(6), pages 449-461.
    17. Giorgio d'Agostino & Luca Pieroni & J Paul Dunne, 2009. "Optimal Military Spending in the US: A Time Series Analysis," Working Papers 0903, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    18. Fiaz Hussain & Shahzad Hussain & Naila Erum, 2015. "Are Defense Expenditures Pro Poor or Anti Poor in Pakistan? An Empirical Investigation," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 54(4), pages 875-894.
    19. Joanne Evans & Eleftherios Goulas & Paul Levine, 2007. "Military Expenditure And Migration In Europe," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(4), pages 305-316.
    20. Jesús Crespo Cuaresma & Gerhard Reitschuler, 2006. "'Guns Or Butter?' Revisited: Robustness And Nonlinearity Issues In The Defense-Growth Nexus," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 53(4), pages 523-541, September.
    21. H. Sonmez Atesoglu, 2009. "Defense Spending And Aggregate Output In The United States," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(1), pages 21-26.
    22. Muhammad Shahbaz & Talat Afza & Muhammad Shahbaz Shabbir, 2013. "Does Defence Spending Impede Economic Growth? Cointegration And Causality Analysis For Pakistan," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(2), pages 105-120, April.
    23. J Paul Dunne & Mehmet Uye, 2009. "Military Spending and Development," Working Papers 0902, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    24. repec:taf:defpea:v:28:y:2017:i:6:p:719-730 is not listed on IDEAS

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