IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/taf/defpea/v11y2000i4p587-596.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Military expenditure and employment in South Africa

Author

Listed:
  • Paul Dunne
  • Duncan Watson

Abstract

Previous research into the impact of military expenditure on employment finds considerable variation across countries. This paper adds to the debate by examining the long run relationship between military burden and manufacturing employment in South Africa. Such an analysis provides an opportunity to test for crowding-out effects and the impact of the marked decline in military spending on the South African economy. The paper finds evidence supporting the view that military expenditure will have a detrimental impact on long term manufacturing employment, adversely affecting industrial structure and efficiency.

Suggested Citation

  • Paul Dunne & Duncan Watson, 2000. "Military expenditure and employment in South Africa," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(4), pages 587-596.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:defpea:v:11:y:2000:i:4:p:587-596
    DOI: 10.1080/10430710008404968
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10430710008404968
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Pesaran, M.H. & Shin, Y., 1995. "An Autoregressive Distributed Lag Modelling Approach to Cointegration Analysis," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 9514, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    2. Newell, A. & Symons, J., 1988. "Stylised Facts And The Labour Demand Curve," Papers 322, London School of Economics - Centre for Labour Economics.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Delucchi, Mark A. & Murphy, James J., 2008. "US military expenditures to protect the use of Persian Gulf oil for motor vehicles," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(6), pages 2253-2264, June.
    2. Chien-Chiang Lee & Chun-Ping Chang, 2006. "The Long-Run Relationship Between Defence Expenditures And Gdp In Taiwan," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(4), pages 361-385.
    3. Julide Yildirim & Selami Sezgin, 2003. "Military expenditure and employment in Turkey," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(2), pages 129-139.
    4. J Paul Dunne, 2011. "Military Keynesianism: An Assessment," Working Papers 1106, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    5. Eric S. Lin & Hamid E. Ali, 2009. "Military Spending and Inequality: Panel Granger Causality Test," Journal of Peace Research, Peace Research Institute Oslo, vol. 46(5), pages 671-685, September.
    6. Christos Kollias & Thanasis Maniatis, 2003. "Military expenditure and the profit rate in Greece," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(2), pages 117-127.
    7. Paul Dunne & Duncan Watson, 2005. "Manufacturing Growth, Technological Progress, and Military Expenditure," Working Papers 0511, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    8. Jesús Crespo Cuaresma & Gerhard Reitschuler, 2004. "A non-linear defence-growth nexus? evidence from the US economy," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(1), pages 71-82, February.
    9. Suna Korkmaz, 2015. "The Effect of Military Spending on Economic Growth and Unemployment in Mediterranean Countries," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 5(1), pages 273-280.
    10. Luca Pieroni, 2007. "How Strong is the Relationship between Defence Expenditure and Private Consumption? Evidence from the United States," Working Papers 0705, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:defpea:v:11:y:2000:i:4:p:587-596. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Chris Longhurst). General contact details of provider: http://www.tandfonline.com/GDPE20 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.