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The Effect of Military Spending on Economic Growth and Unemployment in Mediterranean Countries

Author

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  • Suna Korkmaz

    (Bandýrma Faculty of Economics and Administrative Sciences Department of Economics, Balikesir University, 10200 Bandýrma, Turkey.)

Abstract

One of the necessities of public life and one of the basic elements of the state aiming to fulfill the demands and requirements of individuals which form the community is sovereignty. Sovereignty is separated into two as internal and external. This means, state should provide internal security and peace and also should be able to protect itself against the external threats. In order for a state to achieve these, it has to fulfill the defense services. Due to the unease in Arab regions after Arab spring and as Mediterranean region has strategic importance, 10 countries in Mediterranean region were selected and analysis with panel data was performed for years 2005-2012, in order to examine the effect of military spending of these countries on economic growth and unemployment.

Suggested Citation

  • Suna Korkmaz, 2015. "The Effect of Military Spending on Economic Growth and Unemployment in Mediterranean Countries," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 5(1), pages 273-280.
  • Handle: RePEc:eco:journ1:2015-01-22
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:seb:journl:v:15:y:2017:i:2:p:103-125 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:cmj:seapas:y:2018:i:16:p:97-106 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    military spending; economic growth; unemployment; panel data analysis;

    JEL classification:

    • C51 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Model Construction and Estimation
    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • F5 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy
    • H5 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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