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Military Spending and Economic Growth

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  • Luca Pieroni

    () (University of Perugia and University of the West of England)

Abstract

This paper proposes to test the relationship between military expenditure and economic growth by including the impact of the share of military and civilian components of government expenditure in an economic growth model with endogenous technology. In this framework, we empirically consider the hypothesis of a nonlinear effect of military expenditure on economic growth. The comparison between costs and benefits of defence sector has traditionally explained the nonlinear relationship. This paper suggests that shocks to insecurity may also be a source of nonlinearity as they determine a re-allocative effect within government expenditure. While parametric partial correlations are in line with empirical findings, the robustness of estimations is tested by using a nonparametric approach. The negative relationship between military expenditure and growth in countries with high levels of military burden predicted by theory becomes significant only after including a proxy for re-allocative effects in the growth equation.

Suggested Citation

  • Luca Pieroni, 2007. "Military Spending and Economic Growth," Working Papers 0708, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwe:wpaper:0708
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    File URL: http://carecon.org.uk/DPs/0708.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2007
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    3. Landau, Daniel, 1993. "The economic impact of military expenditures," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1138, The World Bank.
    4. Joshua Aizenman & Reuven Glick, 2006. "Military expenditure, threats, and growth," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(2), pages 129-155.
    5. Deger, Saadet & Sen, Somnath, 1995. "Military expenditure and developing countries," Handbook of Defense Economics,in: Keith Hartley & Todd Sandler (ed.), Handbook of Defense Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 11, pages 275-307 Elsevier.
    6. Jesús Crespo Cuaresma & Gerhard Reitschuler, 2006. "'Guns Or Butter?' Revisited: Robustness And Nonlinearity Issues In The Defense-Growth Nexus," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 53(4), pages 523-541, September.
    7. Robert J. Barro, 1991. "Economic Growth in a Cross Section of Countries," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 407-443.
    8. Jesús Crespo Cuaresma & Gerhard Reitschuler, 2004. "A non-linear defence-growth nexus? evidence from the US economy," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(1), pages 71-82, February.
    9. Bruce E. Hansen, 2000. "Sample Splitting and Threshold Estimation," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 68(3), pages 575-604, May.
    10. Devarajan, Shantayanan & Swaroop, Vinaya & Heng-fu, Zou, 1996. "The composition of public expenditure and economic growth," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(2-3), pages 313-344, April.
    11. Andrea Mario Lavezzi & Davide Fiaschi, 2004. "Nonlinear Growth and the Productivity Slowdown," Computing in Economics and Finance 2004 162, Society for Computational Economics.
    12. Morrison, Catherine J & Schwartz, Amy Ellen, 1996. "State Infrastructure and Productive Performance," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(5), pages 1095-1111, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:jed:journl:v:42:y:2017:i:2:p:51-66 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. d'Agostino, Giorgio & Daddi, Pierluigi & Pieroni, Luca & Steinbrueck, Eric, 2014. "Does military spending stimulate growth? An empirical investigation in Italy," MPRA Paper 58290, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Giorgio d'Agostino & Luca Pieroni & J Paul Dunne, 2010. "Assessing the Effects of Military Expenditure on Growth," Working Papers 1012, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    4. Giorgio d'Agostino & Luca Pieroni & J Paul Dunne, 2009. "Optimal Military Spending in the US: A Time Series Analysis," Working Papers 0903, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    5. Pieroni Luca & d'Agostino Giorgio, 2009. "Military Spending, Corruption and Economic Growth," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 14(3), pages 1-14, March.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economic growth; military burden; cross-section estimations;

    JEL classification:

    • H5 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence

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