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Bairoch revisited: tariff structure and growth in the late nineteenth century

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  • TENA-JUNGUITO, ANTONIO

Abstract

This article revisits Bairoch's hypothesis that in the late nineteenth century tariffs were positively associated with growth, as recently confirmed by a new generation of quantitative studies (see O'Rourke 2000; Jacks 2006; Clemens and Williamson 2002, 2004). This article highlights the importance of the structure of protection in the relation between trade policy and its potential growth-promoting impact. Evidence is based on a new database on industrial tariffs for the 1870s. The results show that income, factor endowment and policy independence are important for explaining regional asymmetries between tariffs and growth. At a global level, increased protection, measured by total and average tariffs on manufactures, implied more unskilled inefficient protection and less growth, and this is especially true for the poor countries in the late nineteenth century. Protection was only positive for a ‘rich club’ if we include in this group new settler countries, which grew rapidly in the late nineteenth century and imposed high tariffs mainly for fiscal reasons.

Suggested Citation

  • Tena-Junguito, Antonio, 2010. "Bairoch revisited: tariff structure and growth in the late nineteenth century," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 14(1), pages 111-143, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:ereveh:v:14:y:2010:i:01:p:111-143_99
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    1. The Bairoch hypothesis (or the “tariff-growth paradox” of the late 19th century)
      by pseudoerasmus in Pseudoerasmus on 2016-12-25 22:35:53

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    Cited by:

    1. Alejandro Ayuso-Díaz & Antonio Tena-Junguito, 2019. "Trade in the Shadow of Power: Japanese Industrial Exports in the Interwar years," Working Papers 0153, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    2. Tena-Junguito, Antonio & Lampe, Markus & Fernandes, Felipe Tã‚Mega, 2012. "How Much Trade Liberalization Was There in the World Before and After Cobden-Chevalier?," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 72(3), pages 708-740, August.
    3. Léo CHARLES, 2013. "Why did Switzerland succeed? An analysis of Swiss specializations (1885-1905)," Cahiers du GREThA (2007-2019) 2013-15, Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée (GREThA).
    4. Stéphane Bécuwe & Bertrand Blancheton & Léo Charles, 2013. "First globalization: why did France missed the boat?," Working Papers hal-00879996, HAL.
    5. Stéphane BECUWE & Bertrand BLANCHETON, 2011. "Tariff growth paradox between 1850 and 1913: a critical survey (In French)," Cahiers du GREThA (2007-2019) 2011-24, Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée (GREThA).
    6. Bajo-Rubio, Oscar, 2020. "Exports and long-run growth: The case of Spain, 1850-2017," GLO Discussion Paper Series 461, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    7. Brian D. Varian, 2018. "Anglo†American trade costs during the first era of globalization: the contribution of a bilateral tariff series," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 71(1), pages 190-212, February.
    8. Stéphane BECUWE & Bertrand BLANCHETON & Léo CHARLES, 2012. "The decline of French trade power during the first globalization (1850-1913)," Cahiers du GREThA (2007-2019) 2012-22, Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée (GREThA).
    9. Carlo Ciccarelli & Alberto Dalmazzo & Daniela Vuri, 2018. "Home Sweet Home: the Effect of Sugar Protectionism on Emigration in Italy, 1876-1913," CEIS Research Paper 437, Tor Vergata University, CEIS, revised 08 Jun 2018.
    10. Stéphane BECUWE & Bertrand BLANCHETON, 2011. "Tariffs dispersion in France between 1850 and 1913, contribution to tariff growth paradox (In French)," Cahiers du GREThA (2007-2019) 2011-21, Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée (GREThA).
    11. Toshiki Kawashima, 2018. "A European Political-Economic Space That Embraced Japan: The International Context of the Conventional Tariff Network, CA. 1892-1914," CEH Discussion Papers 08, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    12. Broadberry, Stephen; Crafts, Nicholas., 2010. "Openness, Protectionism And Britain’S Productivity Performance Over The Long-Run," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 36, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).

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