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Openness and growth in a historical perspective: a VECM approach

Author

Listed:
  • Giovanni Federico

    (University of Pisa, CEPR)

  • Paul Sharp

    (University of Southern Denmark, CAGE, CEPR)

  • Antonio Tena-Junguito

    (Universidad Carlos III Madrid)

Abstract

Since Adam Smith, most economists have held the belief that trade fosters economic growth, although it has not been possible to establish a strong causal relationship. The results of growth regressions are, at best, mixed, and several historical studies have found a positive relationship between tariffs and economic growth in the nineteenth century. This paper adopts a different strategy. We look for cointegration between GDP per capita and openness for about thirty countries since 1830. About half return no cointegration – i.e. no relationship. The rest show mixed results, which change through time. An ordered probit model suggests that significantly positive relationships are more likely at low-to-middle income levels.

Suggested Citation

  • Giovanni Federico & Paul Sharp & Antonio Tena-Junguito, 2017. "Openness and growth in a historical perspective: a VECM approach," Working Papers 0118, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
  • Handle: RePEc:hes:wpaper:0118
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    File URL: http://www.ehes.org/EHES_118.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Markus Lampe & Paul Sharp, 2013. "Tariffs and income: a time series analysis for 24 countries," Cliometrica, Journal of Historical Economics and Econometric History, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC), vol. 7(3), pages 207-235, September.
    2. Federico, Giovanni & Tena Junguito, Antonio, 2016. "World trade, 1800-1938 : a new data-set," IFCS - Working Papers in Economic History.WH wp16-01, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Instituto Figuerola.
    3. Marin, Dalia, 1992. "Is the Export-Led.Growth Hypothesis Valid for Industrialized Countries?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 74(4), pages 678-688, November.
    4. Tena Junguito, Antonio, 2008. "Bairoch revisited : tariff structure and growth in the late 19th century," IFCS - Working Papers in Economic History.WH wp08-04, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Instituto Figuerola.
    5. Sibylle H. Lehmann & Kevin H. O'Rourke, 2011. "The Structure of Protection and Growth in the Late Nineteenth Century," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 93(2), pages 606-616, May.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Openness; growth; VECM; cointegration; trade;

    JEL classification:

    • F1 - International Economics - - Trade
    • N1 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations
    • N7 - Economic History - - Economic History: Transport, International and Domestic Trade, Energy, and Other Services

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