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The Structure of Protection and Growth in the Late Nineteenth Century


  • Sibylle H. Lehmann

    (Universität Köln)

  • Kevin H. O'Rourke


Many papers have explored the relationship between average tariff rates and economic growth when theory suggests that the structure of protection is what should matter. We therefore explore the relationship between economic growth and agricultural tariffs, industrial tariffs, and revenue tariffs for a sample of relatively well-developed countries between 1875 and 1913. Industrial tariffs were positively correlated with growth, and agricultural tariffs were generally negatively correlated with growth, although the results are not robust. Revenue tariffs were not related to growth at all. © 2011 The President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Suggested Citation

  • Sibylle H. Lehmann & Kevin H. O'Rourke, 2011. "The Structure of Protection and Growth in the Late Nineteenth Century," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 93(2), pages 606-616, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:93:y:2011:i:2:p:606-616

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    7. Mark Aguiar & Erik Hurst, 2007. "Measuring Trends in Leisure: The Allocation of Time Over Five Decades," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 122(3), pages 969-1006.
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    Blog mentions

    As found by, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. The Bairoch hypothesis (or the “tariff-growth paradox” of the late 19th century)
      by pseudoerasmus in Pseudoerasmus on 2016-12-25 22:35:53


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    Cited by:

    1. Kevin H. O’Rourke, 2012. "From Empire to Europe: Britain in the World Economy," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _106, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
    2. Giovanni Federico & Paul Sharp & Antonio Tena-Junguito, 2017. "Openness and growth in a historical perspective: a VECM approach," Working Papers 0118, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    3. Kevin H. O'Rourke, 2016. "Independent Ireland In Comparative Perspective," Working Papers 201620, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    4. Liu, Dan & Meissner, Christopher M., 2015. "Market potential and the rise of US productivity leadership," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(1), pages 72-87.
    5. Dan Liu & Christopher M. Meissner, 2013. "Market Potential and the Rise of US Productivity Leadership," NBER Working Papers 18819, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Harold James & Kevin H. O'Rourke, 2011. "Italy and the first age of globalization, 1861-1940," Quaderni di storia economica (Economic History Working Papers) 16, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    7. Broadberry, Stephen; Crafts, Nicholas., 2010. "Openness, Protectionism And Britain’S Productivity Performance Over The Long-Run," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 36, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).

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