IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/mil/wpdepa/2003-08.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The role of freedom, growth and religion in the taste for revolution

Author

Listed:
  • Silvia Pezzini

    ()

  • Robert MacCulloch

    ()

Abstract

A fundamental question about the determinants of civil conflict is the relative importanceof political freedoms versus economic development. This paper takes a new approach toprovide an answer by using micro-data based on surveys of revolutionary tastes of130,000 people living in 61 nations between 1981 and 1997. Controlling for personalcharacteristics, country and year fixed effects, more freedom and economic growth bothreduce revolutionary support. Losing one level of freedom, equivalent to a shift from theUS to Turkey, increases support for revolt by 4 percentage points. To reduce support bythe same amount requires adding 14 percentage points onto the GDP growth rate. BeingMuslim in a free country has no effect on the probability of supporting revolt comparedto a non-religious person. However being Muslim in a country that is not free increases itby 13 percentage points. Being Christian in a free country decreases the chance ofsupporting revolt by 4 percentage points, compared to a non-religious person, and in anot-free country by 1 percentage point.

Suggested Citation

  • Silvia Pezzini & Robert MacCulloch, 2003. "The role of freedom, growth and religion in the taste for revolution," Departmental Working Papers 2003-08, Department of Economics, Management and Quantitative Methods at Università degli Studi di Milano.
  • Handle: RePEc:mil:wpdepa:2003-08
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://wp.demm.unimi.it/files/wp/2003/DEMM-2003_008wp.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Bruno S. Frey, 2007. "Overprotected Politicians," CESifo Working Paper Series 2019, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Bruno Frey & Matthias Benz & Alois Stutzer, 2004. "Introducing Procedural Utility: Not Only What, but Also How Matters," Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics (JITE), Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 160(3), pages 377-377, September.
    3. Klaus Abbink & Silvia Pezzini, 2005. "Determinants of Revolt: Evidence from Survey and Laboratory Data," Discussion Papers 2005-01, The Centre for Decision Research and Experimental Economics, School of Economics, University of Nottingham.
    4. David Masclet & Marie-Claire Villeval, 2008. "Punishment, inequality, and welfare: a public good experiment," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 31(3), pages 475-502, October.
    5. Berazneva, Julia & Lee, David R., 2013. "Explaining the African food riots of 2007–2008: An empirical analysis," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 28-39.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Revolution; Freedom; Development; Growth; Religion.;

    JEL classification:

    • D74 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Conflict; Conflict Resolution; Alliances; Revolutions
    • H11 - Public Economics - - Structure and Scope of Government - - - Structure and Scope of Government
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development
    • O4 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity
    • Z12 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Religion

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:mil:wpdepa:2003-08. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (DEMM Working Papers) The email address of this maintainer does not seem to be valid anymore. Please ask DEMM Working Papers to update the entry or send us the correct email address. General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/damilit.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.