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The Local Labour Market Effects of Immigration in the UK

Author

Listed:
  • Dustmann, Christian

    (University College London)

  • Francesca Fabbri
  • Ian Preston

Abstract

This paper provides an empirical analysis of the employment effects of immigration using UK data. We show that on a theoretical level, the effects of immigration on labour market outcomes depend on assumptions regarding the number of goods produced in the economy, and whether these goods are tradable or not. We then discuss the problems that may arise in empirical estimations, and suggests ways to address these problems. Our empirical analysis is based on data from the Labour Force Survey. There is some evidence that immigration affects employment prospects negatively; however, estimated effects are not significantly different from zero.

Suggested Citation

  • Dustmann, Christian & Francesca Fabbri & Ian Preston, 2003. "The Local Labour Market Effects of Immigration in the UK," Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2003 70, Royal Economic Society.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:ac2003:70
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ellison, Glenn & Glaeser, Edward L, 1997. "Geographic Concentration in U.S. Manufacturing Industries: A Dartboard Approach," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 105(5), pages 889-927, October.
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    6. Wagner, Alfred, 1891. "Marshall's Principles of Economics," History of Economic Thought Articles, McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought, vol. 5, pages 319-338.
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    9. Maurel, Francoise & Sedillot, Beatrice, 1999. "A measure of the geographic concentration in french manufacturing industries," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 575-604, September.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Karin Mayr, 2003. "Immigration and Majority Voting on Income Redistriubtion-Is there a Case for Opposition from Natives?," Economics working papers 2003-08, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
    2. Anna Rosso, 2016. "Skill Transferability and Immigrant-Native Wage Gaps," Development Working Papers 405, Centro Studi Luca d'Agliano, University of Milano, revised 21 Oct 2016.
    3. Timothy J. Hatton & Massimiliano Tani, 2005. "Immigration and Inter-Regional Mobility in the UK, 1982-2000," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(507), pages 342-358, November.
    4. Gerard Thomas Horvath, 2011. "Immigration and Distribution of Wages in Austria," Economics working papers 2011-11, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
    5. Timothy Hatton, 2005. "Explaining trends in UK immigration," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 18(4), pages 719-740, November.
    6. William Betz & Nicole Simpson, 2013. "The effects of international migration on the well-being of native populations in Europe," IZA Journal of Migration, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 2(1), pages 1-21, December.
    7. Nathan, Max, 2011. "The long term impacts of migration in British cities: diversity, wages, employment and prices," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 33577, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    8. Kwon, Chul-Woo & Chun, Bong Geul, 2011. "Relationship regarding the demand for labor between domestic temporary and foreign workers: Korean case," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 240-245.
    9. Hainmueller, Jens & Hiscox, Michael J., 2007. "Educated Preferences: Explaining Attitudes Toward Immigration in Europe," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 61(02), pages 399-442, April.
    10. Stefano STAFFOLANI & Enzo VALENTINI, 2009. "Does Immigration Raise Blue and White Collar Wages of Natives?," Working Papers 330, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche (I), Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali.
    11. Steinhardt, Max Friedrich, 2006. "Arbeitsmarkt und Migration: Eine empirische Analyse der Lohn- und Beschäftigungseffekte der Zuwanderung für Deutschland," HWWI Research Papers 3-4, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    immigration; labour market;

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

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