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A gravity model analysis of international migration to North America

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  • David Karemera
  • Victor Iwuagwu Oguledo
  • Bobby Davis

Abstract

This study examines the influence of political, economic and demographic factors on the size and composition of migration flows to North America. A modified gravity model is specified and adjusted to include immigration regulations and characteristics specific to the origin and destination countries. For empirical test of the model, the time period of study is from 1976-1986, and 70 countries are covered for a total of 1540 observations of migration flows to Canada and the USA. The results reveal that the population of origin countries and the income of destination countries are two major determinants of migration to North America. High population areas of Asia and Latin America provided a large share of the immigrants. Domestic restrictions on political and civil freedom in origin countries are found to significantly impair migration to North America.

Suggested Citation

  • David Karemera & Victor Iwuagwu Oguledo & Bobby Davis, 2000. "A gravity model analysis of international migration to North America," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(13), pages 1745-1755.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:32:y:2000:i:13:p:1745-1755
    DOI: 10.1080/000368400421093
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Greenwood, Michael J, et al, 1991. "Migration, Regional Equilibrium, and the Estimation of Compensating Differentials," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(5), pages 1382-1390, December.
    2. Greenwood, Michael J & McDowell, John M, 1986. "The Factor Market Consequences of U.S. Immigration," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 24(4), pages 1738-1772, December.
    3. Borjas, George J, 1987. "Self-Selection and the Earnings of Immigrants," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(4), pages 531-553, September.
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