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Is there a Wage Premium for Returning Irish Migrants?

Author

Listed:
  • Alan Barrett

    (Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI))

  • Philip J. O'Connell

    (Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI))

Abstract

Higher rates of economic growth in recent years have led Ireland from being a country characterised by emigration to one where population inflows have become an important issue. This paper contains an analysis of one element of the current inflow. Drawing on data collected in 1998 on over 800 Irish individuals who had graduated from Irish colleges in 1992, we compare the wages of returned migrants with the wages of those stayed in Ireland. In a recent paper, it has been argued that returned migrants accumulate skills and competencies while away that are rewarded on return to the home country. We find support for this argument for men. On average, returning males earn 10 percent more than men who stayed in Ireland, controlling for a range of factors. However, men who say that they originally migrated for labour-related reasons earn 15 percent more. No wage premium is found for female returning migrants relative to female stayers.

Suggested Citation

  • Alan Barrett & Philip J. O'Connell, 2000. "Is there a Wage Premium for Returning Irish Migrants?," Papers WP125, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:esr:wpaper:wp125
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Co, Catherine Y. & Gang, Ira N. & Yun, Myeong-Su, 1998. "Returns to Returning: Who Went Abroad and What Does it Matter?," IZA Discussion Papers 19, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
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    4. Borjas, George J, 1987. "Self-Selection and the Earnings of Immigrants," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(4), pages 531-553, September.
    5. Oded Stark, 1991. "The Migration of Labor," Blackwell Books, Wiley Blackwell, number 1557860300, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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