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Divorce among European and Mexican Immigrants in the U.S

Author

Listed:
  • Barry Chiswick

    (George Washington University)

  • Christina Houseworth

    (University of Illinois at Chicago)

Abstract

This paper analyzes the status of being currently divorced among European and Mexican immigrants in the U.S., among themselves and in comparison to the native born of the same ancestries. The data are for males and females age 18 to 55, who married only once, in the 2010-2014 American Community Surveys. Among immigrants, better job opportunities, measured by educational attainment, English proficiency and a longer duration in the U.S. are associated with a higher probability of being divorced.Those who married prior to migration and who first married at an older age are less likely to be divorced. Those who live in states with a higher divorce rate are more likely to be divorced.Thus, currently being divorced among immigrants is more likely for those who are better positioned in the labor market, less closely connected to their ethnic origins, and among Mexican immigrants who live in an environment in which divorce is more prevalent.

Suggested Citation

  • Barry Chiswick & Christina Houseworth, 2019. "Divorce among European and Mexican Immigrants in the U.S," Working Papers 2019-12, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
  • Handle: RePEc:gwi:wpaper:2019-12
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Bansak, Cynthia & Pearlman, Sarah, 2021. "Endogamous Marriage among Immigrant Groups: The Impact of Deportations under Secure Communities," GLO Discussion Paper Series 756, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    2. Cynthia Bansak & Sarah Pearlman, 2022. "Marriage and immigration enforcement: The impact of Secure Communities on immigrant women," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 60(1), pages 351-372, January.
    3. Errol, Zeresh & Madsen, Jakob B. & Moslehi, Solmaz, 2021. "Social disorganization theory and crime in the advanced countries: Two centuries of evidence," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 191(C), pages 519-537.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Marriage; Divorce; Minorities; Immigrants; Gender; Human Capital;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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