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The impact of parent's and spouses' education on divorce rates in Norway

  • Torkild Lyngstad

    (University of Oslo)

Registered author(s):

    According to both economic and sociological theory, a couple's divorce rate may be influenced by their own educational attainment, that of their parents, and whether they have taken further education after marriage, although predictions are ambiguous. However, these three variables have never been included simultaneously and few studies have included both partners' characteristics. A discrete-time hazard model based on register and census data on 54178 Norwegian first marriages started 1980-1999 reveals a very strong negative educational gradient in divorce risk and no particularly harmful influence of heterogamy. Parent's education exerts a small positive effect, however. Among couples with the same current level of education, those who have taken education after entry into marriage display the highest divorce rate.

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    File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol10/5/10-5.pdf
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    Article provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its journal Demographic Research.

    Volume (Year): 10 (2004)
    Issue (Month): 5 (April)
    Pages: 121-142

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    Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:10:y:2004:i:5
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

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    1. Becker, Gary S & Landes, Elisabeth M & Michael, Robert T, 1977. "An Economic Analysis of Marital Instability," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 85(6), pages 1141-87, December.
    2. Andrew Cherlin & Kathleen Kiernan & P. Chase-Lansdale, 1995. "Parental divorce in childhood and demographic outcomes in young adulthood," Demography, Springer, vol. 32(3), pages 299-318, August.
    3. Marika Jalovaara, 2002. "Socioeconomic differentials in divorce risk by duration of marriage," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 7(16), pages 537-564, November.
    4. Guiping Liu, 2002. "How premarital children and childbearing in current marriage influence divorce of Swedish women in their first marriages," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 7(10), pages 389-406, August.
    5. Jay Teachman, 2002. "Stability across cohorts in divorce risk factors," Demography, Springer, vol. 39(2), pages 331-351, May.
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